Online Dictionary

Benedictine Explained

benedictine at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

['benə'dıktın]

Benedictine at English => English (English Etymology) Of Explained:

1602, "one of the order known from the color of its dress as the Black Monks," founded c.529 by St. Benedict (see benedict). ///

Benedictine at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

n [C] [Date: 1600-1700; Language: French; Origin: benedictin, from Latin Benedictus '(Saint) Benedict']// a member of a Christian religious order of monks// -- Benedictine adj //

benedictine at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

n [U and C] [Date: 1800-1900; Origin: Benedictine; because it is made by Benedictine monks]// a strong alcoholic drink that is a type of liqueur//

Benedictine at English => English (The Britannica Concise) Of Explained:

Member of the Order of St. Benedict, the confederated autonomous congregations of monks and lay brothers who follow the Benedictine Rule, created by St. Benedict of Nursia in the 6th cent. The Rule spread slowly in Italy and Gaul. By the 9th cent. it was nearly universal in N and W Europe, where Benedictine monasteries became repositories of learning, literature, and wealth. The order declined during the 12th-15th cent., when it was revived with reforms that limited abbots to fixed terms and required monks to make their vows to the congregation rather than a particular house. The Reformation virtually eliminated Benedictines from N Europe, and they declined elsewhere. In the 19th cent. another revival strengthened the order in Europe, especially in France and Germany, and led to the establishment of new congregations worldwide.

Benedictine at English => English (Moby Thesaurus II) Of Explained:

38 Moby Thesaurus words for "Benedictine":
Augustinian, Augustinian Hermit, Austin Friar, Bernardine,
Black Friar, Black Monk, Bonhomme, Brigittine, Capuchin, Carmelite,
Carthusian, Cistercian, Cluniac, Conventual, Crossed Friar,
Crutched Friar, Dominican, Franciscan, Friar Minor, Gilbertine,
Gray Friar, Hospitaler, Jesuit, Loyolite, Marist, Maryknoll,
Minorite, Observant, Oratorian, Premonstratensian, Recollect,
Recollet, Redemptorist, Templar, Trappist, White Friar,
begging hermit, preaching friar

Benedictine at English => English (Oxford Advanced Learners) Of Explained:

Benedictine at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Benedictine \Ben`e*dic"tine\, a.
Pertaining to the monks of St. Benedict, or St. Benet.

Benedictine \Ben`e*dic"tine\, n. (Eccl. Hist.)
One of a famous order of monks, established by St. Benedict
of Nursia in the sixth century. This order was introduced
into the United States in 1846.

Note: The Benedictines wear black clothing, and are sometimes
called Black Monks. The name Black Fr????rs which
belongs to the Dominicans, is also sometimes applied to
the Benedictines.

Benedictine at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

Benedictine
adj 1: of or relating to Saint Benedict or his works
2: of or relating to the Benedictines
n 1: a monk or nun belonging to the order founded by Saint
Benedict
2: a French liqueur originally made by Benedictine monks

Benedictine at English (WD) Of Explained:

==English==
Inter: wikipedi » a

Etymology

Possibly via Inter: etyl » fr and/or Inter: etyl » la, named after the founder, Italian 6th century Saint Benedictus of Nursia
: recorded in English only since the 17th century

Noun

Inter: en-nou » n
  • A monk or nun belonging to the order founded by Saint Benedict of Nursia.
    1. A liqueur made from Cognac (French brandy) together with herbs and spices

      Derived terms

      * Benedictine monk

      See also

      * black monk

      Translations

      Inter: trans-top » monk

  • Dutch: Inter: t- » nl|benedictijn|m, Inter: t- » nl|benedictijner|m
  • French: Inter: t+ » fr|bénédictin|m
  • German: Inter: t+ » de|Benediktiner|m

  • Inter: trans-mi » d
    • Italian: Inter: t+ » it|benedettino|m
    • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|бенедиктинец|m|sc=Cyrl|tr=benеdiktínec|alt=бенедикти́нец, Inter: t- » ru|бенедиктинка|f|sc=Cyrl|tr=benеdiktínka|alt=бенедикти́нка


    Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » liqueur
    • Dutch: Inter: t- » nl|benedictine
    • French: Inter: t+ » fr|bénédictine


    Inter: trans-mi » d
  • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|бенедиктин|m|sc=Cyrl|tr=benеdiktín|alt=бенедикти́н

  • Inter: trans-botto » m

    Adjective

    Inter: en-adj » -
  • Of or pertaining to St. Benedict of Nursia.
    1. Of or pertaining to the Benedictine Order.

      Translations

      Inter: trans-top » of or pertaining to St. Benedict of Nursia

  • Dutch: Inter: t- » nl|benedictijns
  • Esperanto: Inter: t- » eo|benediktana
  • French: Inter: t+ » fr|bénédictin

  • Inter: trans-mi » d
    • Italian: Inter: t+ » it|benedettino
    • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|бенедиктинский|sc=Cyrl|tr=benеdiktínskij|alt=бенедикти́нский


    Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » of or pertaining to the Benedictine Order
    • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|бенедиктинский|sc=Cyrl|tr=benеdiktínskij|alt=бенедикти́нский


    Inter: trans-mi » d
    Inter: trans-botto » m

    References

    * Inter: R:Online Etymology Dictionar » y
    Category: Category:English eponyms -
    Translation: et » Benedictine
    Translation: io » Benedictine
    Translation: ta » Benedictine

    bénédictine at English (WD) Of Explained:

    ==French==

    Adjective

    Inter: fr-adj-for » m {{f}}
  • Inter: form of » feminine|bénédictin|lang=fr

  • Translation: fr » bénédictine
    Translation: mg » bénédictine
    Translation: vi » bénédictine