Online Dictionary

Cavendish Explained

cavendish at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

['kævəndıʃ]

Cavendish at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

Henry (1731-1810) a British scientist who discovered hydrogen and also discovered the chemical composition of water (=the different parts it is made from) //

Cavendish at English => English (The Britannica Concise) Of Explained:

English physicist and chemist. A millionaire by inheritance, he lived as a recluse most of his life. He discovered the nature and properties of hydrogen, the specific heat of certain substances, and various properties of electricity. He measured the density and mass of the earth by the method now known as the Cavendish experiment. He discovered the composition of air, work that led to the discovery that water is a compound rather than an element, and to the discovery of nitric acid. He anticipated Ohm's law, and independently discovered Coulomb's law of electrostatic attraction. He left his fortune to relatives who later endowed the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge Univ. (1871).

Cavendish at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Cavendish \Cav"en*dish\, n.
Leaf tobacco softened, sweetened, and pressed into plugs or
cakes.

{Cut cavendish}, the plugs cut into long shreds for smoking.

Cavendish at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

Cavendish
n : British chemist and physicist who established that water is
a compound of hydrogen and oxygen and who calculated the
density of the earth (1731-1810) [syn: {Henry Cavendish}]

Cavendish at English (WD) Of Explained:

==English==

Proper noun

Inter: en-proper nou » n
  • Inter: surnam » e
  • cavendish at English (WD) Of Explained:

    Inter: also » Cavendish

    English

    Noun

    Inter: en-noun » -
  • Leaf tobacco softened, sweetened, and pressed into plugs or cakes.
    1. Inter: quote-book » year=1919|author=Richard Harding Davis|title=The Exiles and Other Stories|chapter=|edition=|url=http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/16090


    |passage="But the managers seem inclined to cut their cavendish very fine just at present," she said.
  • Inter: quote-book » year=1901|author=Charles Kingsley|title=Two Years Ago, Volume I|chapter=|edition=|url=http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/10920

  • |passage=No man less; only he (not Vieuxbois, but his younger brother) has found a wide-awake cooler than an iron kettle, and travels by rail when he is at home; and when he was in the Crimea, rode a shaggy pony, and smoked cavendish all through the battle of Inkermann." "
    1. Inter: quote-book » year=1896|author=Anonymous|title=The Ladies Book of Useful Information|chapter=|edition=|url=http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/26368


    |passage=Then burn equal parts of cavendish tobacco and old shoeleather in an iron vessel till charred.
  • Inter: quote-book » year=1868|author=George A. Lawrence|title=Guy Livingstone;|chapter=|edition=|url=http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/17084

  • |passage=It was always an augury of foul weather in Livingstone's temper when, instead of the decent evening cigar, he smoked the short black brule-gueule, loaded to the muzzle with cavendish.
    1. Inter: quote-book » year=1817|author=R.M. Ballantyne|title=The Pirate City|chapter=|edition=|url=http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/21692


    |passage=Come, I'll trate ye to a taste o' me cavendish, which is better than growlin' in yer hammock at the muskaities, poor things, as don't know no better."

    Derived terms

    * cut cavendish: with the plugs cut into long shreds for smoking
    Inter: Webster 191 » 3
    Translation: ta » cavendish
    Translation: vi » cavendish
    Translation: zh » cavendish