Online Dictionary

Chad Explained

chad at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

[tʃæd]

Chad at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

a country in north central Africa, between Niger and Sudan. Population: 8,707,000 (2001) Capital: N'djamena.//

Chad at English => English (The Britannica Concise) Of Explained:

Republic, N central Africa. Area: 495,752 sq mi (1,283,998 sq km). Population (1997 est.): 7,166,000. Capital: N'Djamena. The Sara is the largest ethnic group, at about one-quarter of the total population; other groups include the Bagirmi and Bongo, the Lake and Mbum, the Tangale, and the Buduma, Kuri, and Kanemba. Arabs, composed of a multitude of tribes, represent a single ethnic group. Languages: French, Arabic (both official), and more than 100 dialects and languages. Religions: Islam, animism, Roman Catholicism, Protestantism. Currency: CFA franc. The landlocked country's terrain is a shallow basin that rises gradually from 750 ft (228 m) above sea level at Lake Chad. The basin is rimmed by mountains, incl. the volcanic Tibesti Massif to the north, rising to 11,204 ft (3,415 m) at Mt. Koussi. Its lowest elevation is the Djourab Depression, at 573 ft (175 m). Chad's river network is limited to the Chari and Logone rivers and their tributaries, which flow from the southeast into Lake Chad. It has an agricultural economy. It is a republic with one legislative body; its chief of state is the president and its head of government, the prime minister. Around AD 800 the kingdom of Kanem was founded, and by the early 1200s its borders had expanded to form a new kingdom, Kanem-Bornu, in the N regions of the area. Its power peaked in the 16th cent. with its command of the S terminus of the trans-Sahara trade route to Tripoli. Around this time the rival kingdoms of Baguirmi and Wadai evolved in the south. In the years 1883-93 all three kingdoms fell to the Sudanese adventurer Rabih az-Zubayr, who was in turn pushed out by the French in 1891. Extending their power, the French in 1910 made Chad a part of French Equatorial Africa. Chad became a separate colony in 1920 and was made an overseas territory in 1946. The country achieved independence in 1960. This was followed by decades of civil war, and frequent intervention by France and Libya.

Chad at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Chad \Chad\, n.
See {Shad}. [Obs.]

chad at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Shad \Shad\ (sh[a^]d), n. sing. & pl. [AS. sceadda a kind of
fish, akin to Prov. G. schade; cf. Ir. & Gael. sgadan a
herring, W. ysgadan herrings; all perhaps akin to E. skate a
fish.] (Zo["o]l.)
Any one of several species of food fishes of the Herring
family. The American species ({Clupea sapidissima}), which is
abundant on the Atlantic coast and ascends the larger rivers
in spring to spawn, is an important market fish. The European
allice shad, or alose ({C. alosa}), and the twaite shad. ({C.
finta}), are less important species. [Written also {chad}.]

Note: The name is loosely applied, also, to several other
fishes, as the gizzard shad (see under {Gizzard}),
called also {mud shad}, {white-eyed shad}, and {winter
shad}.

{Hardboaded}, or {Yellow-tailed}, {shad}, the menhaden.

{Hickory}, or {Tailor}, {shad}, the mattowacca.

{Long-boned shad}, one of several species of important food
fishes of the Bermudas and the West Indies, of the genus
{Gerres}.

{Shad bush} (Bot.), a name given to the North American shrubs
or small trees of the rosaceous genus {Amelanchier} ({A.
Canadensis}, and {A. alnifolia}) Their white racemose
blossoms open in April or May, when the shad appear, and
the edible berries (pomes) ripen in June or July, whence
they are called Juneberries. The plant is also called
{service tree}, and {Juneberry}.

{Shad frog}, an American spotted frog ({Rana halecina}); --
so called because it usually appears at the time when the
shad begin to run in the rivers.

{Trout shad}, the squeteague.

{White shad}, the common shad.

Chad at English = English (world95) Of Explained:

led because found in the sorrel, or Oxalis. Also
sometimes inaccurately called {salt of lemon}.

{Salt of tartar} (Old Chem.), potassium carbonate; -- so
called because formerly made by heating cream of tartar,
or potassium tartrate. [Obs.]

{Salt of Venus} (Old Chem.), blue vitriol; copper sulphate;
-- the alchemical name of copper being Venus.

{Salt of wisdom}. See {Alembroth}.

{Sedative salt} (Old Med. Chem.), boric acid.

{Sesqui salt} (Chem.), a salt derived from a sesquioxide base
or analogous compound.

{Spirit of salt}. (Chem.) See under {Spirit}.

{Sulpho salt} (Chem.), a salt analogous to an oxy salt, but
containing sulphur in place of oxygen.Above-cited \A*bove"-cit`ed\, a.
Cited before, in the preceding part of a book or writing.Above-mentioned \A*bove"-men`tioned\, Above-named
\A*bove"-named`\, a.
Mentioned or named before; aforesaid.Above-mentioned \A*bove"-men`tioned\, Above-named
\A*bove"-named`\, a.
Mentioned or named before; aforesaid.Aboveboard \A*bove"board`\, adv.
Above the board or table. Hence: in open sight; without
trick, concealment, or deception. ``Fair and aboveboard.''
--Burke.

Note: This expression is said by Johnson to have been
borrowed from gamesters, who, when they change their
cards, put their hands under the table.Abovedeck \A*bove"deck`\, a.
On deck; and hence, like aboveboard, without artifice.
--Smart.Abovesaid \A*bove"said`\, a.
Mentioned or recited before.Abox \A*box"\, adv. & a. (Naut.)
Braced aback.Abra \A"bra\, n. [Sp., a bay, valley, fissure.]
A narrow pass or defile; a break in a mesa; the mouth of a
ca[~n]on. [Southwestern U. S.]Abracadabra \Ab`ra*ca*dab"ra\, n. [L. Of unknown origin.]
A mystical word or collocation of letters written as in the
figure. Worn on an amulet it was supposed to ward off fever.
At present the word is used chiefly in jest to denote
something without meaning; jargon.Abradant \Ab*ra"dant\, n.
A material used for grinding, as emery, sand, powdered glass,
etc.Abrade \Ab*rade"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Abraded}; p. pr. & vb.
n. {Abrading}.] [L. abradere, abrasum, to scrape off; ab +
radere to scrape. See {Rase}, {Raze}.]
To rub or wear off; to waste or wear away by friction; as, to
abrade rocks. --Lyell.

Abrade \A*brade"\, v. t.
Same as {Abraid}. [Obs.]Abrade \Ab*rade"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Abraded}; p. pr. & vb.
n. {Abrading}.] [L. abradere, abrasum, to scrape off; ab +
radere to scrape. See {Rase}, {Raze}.]
To rub or wear off; to waste or wear away by friction; as, to
abrade rocks. --Lyell.Abrade \Ab*rade"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Abraded}; p. pr. & vb.
n. {Abrading}.] [L. abradere, abrasum, to scrape off; ab +
radere to scrape. See {Rase}, {Raze}.]
To rub or wear off; to waste or wear away by friction; as, to
abrade rocks. --Lyell.Sham \Sham\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shammed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
{Shamming}.]
1. To trick; to cheat; to deceive or delude with false
pretenses.

Fooled and shammed into a conviction. --L'Estrange.

2. To obtrude by fraud or imposition. [R.]

We must have a care that we do not . . . sham
fallacies upon the world for current reason.
--L'Estrange.

3. To assume the manner and character of; to imitate; to ape;
to feign.

{To sham Abram} or {Abraham}, to feign sickness; to malinger.
Hence a malingerer is called, in sailors' cant, Sham
Abram, or Sham Abraham.Abraham-man \A"bra*ham-man`\or Abram-man \A"bram-man`\, n.
[Possibly in allusion to the parable of the beggar Lazarus in
Luke xvi. --Murray (New Eng. Dict. ).]
One of a set of vagabonds who formerly roamed through
England, feigning lunacy for the sake of obtaining alms.
--Nares.

{To sham Abraham}, to feign sickness. --Goldsmith.Abrahamic \A`bra*ham"ic\, a.
Pertaining to Abraham, the patriarch; as, the Abrachamic
covenant.Abrahamitic \A`bra*ham*it"ic\, ical \*ic*al\, a.
Relating to the patriarch Abraham.Abraid \A*braid"\, v. t. & i. [OE. abraiden, to awake, draw (a
sword), AS. [=a]bredgan to shake, draw; pref. [=a]- (cf.
Goth. us-, Ger. er-, orig. meaning out) + bregdan to shake,
throw. See {Braid}.]
To awake; to arouse; to stir or start up; also, to shout out.
[Obs.] --Chaucer.Abraham-man \A"bra*ham-man`\or Abram-man \A"bram-man`\, n.
[Possibly in allusion to the parable of the beggar Lazarus in
Luke xvi. --Murray (New Eng. Dict. ).]
One of a set of vagabonds who formerly roamed through
England, feigning lunacy for the sake of obtaining alms.
--Nares.

{To sham Abraham}, to feign sickness. --Goldsmith.Zope \Zope\, n. [G.] (Zo["o]l.)
A European fresh-water bream ({Abramis ballerus}).Zarthe \Z["a]r"the\, n. (Zo["o]l.)
A European bream ({Abramis vimba}). [Written also {zaerthe}.]Abranchial \A*bran"chi*al\, a. (Zo["o]l.)
Abranchiate.Abranchiata \A*bran`chi*a"ta\, n. pl. [NL., from Gr. 'a priv. +
?, pl., the gills of fishes.] (Zo["o]l.)
A group of annelids, so called because the species composing
it have no special organs of respiration.Abranchiate \A*bran"chi*ate\, a. (Zo["o]l.)
Without gills.Abrase \Ab*rase"\, a. [L. abrasus, p. p. of abradere. See
{Abrade}.]
Rubbed smooth. [Obs.] ``An abrase table.'' --B. Jonson.Abrasion \Ab*ra"sion\, n. [L. abrasio, fr. abradere. See
{Abrade}.]
1. The act of abrading, wearing, or rubbing off; the wearing
away by friction; as, the abrasion of coins.

2. The substance rubbed off. --Berkeley.

3. (Med.) A superficial excoriation, with loss of substance
under the form of small shreds. --Dunglison.Abrasive \Ab*ra"sive\, a.
Producing abrasion. --Ure.Abraum \A*braum"\ or Abraum salts \A*braum" salts\, n. [Ger.,
fr. abr["a]umen to remove.]
A red ocher used to darken mahogany and for making chloride
of potassium.Abraum \A*braum"\ or Abraum salts \A*braum" salts\, n. [Ger.,
fr. abr["a]umen to remove.]
A red ocher used to darken mahogany and for making chloride
of potassium.Abraxas \A*brax"as\, n. [A name adopted by the Egyptian Gnostic
Basilides, containing the Greek letters [alpha], [beta],
[rho], [alpha], [xi], [alpha], [sigma], which, as numerals,
amounted to 365. It was used to signify the supreme deity as
ruler of the 365 heavens of his system.]
A mystical word used as a charm and engraved on gems among
the ancients; also, a gem stone thus engraved.Magpie \Mag"pie\, n. [OE. & Prov. E. magot pie, maggoty pie, fr.
Mag, Maggot, equiv. to Margaret, and fr. F. Marquerite, and
common name of the magpie. Marguerite is fr. L. margarita
pearl, Gr. ?, prob. of Eastern origin. See {Pie} magpie, and
cf. the analogous names {Tomtit}, and {Jackdaw}.] (Zo["o]l.)
Any one of numerous species of the genus {Pica} and related
genera, allied to the jays, but having a long graduated tail.

Note: The common European magpie ({Pica pica}, or {P.
caudata}) is a black and white noisy and mischievous
bird. It can be taught to speak. The American magpie
({P. Hudsonica}) is very similar. The yellow-belled
magpie ({P. Nuttalli}) inhabits California. The blue
magpie ({Cyanopolius Cooki}) inhabits Spain. Other
allied species are found in Asia. The Tasmanian and
Australian magpies are crow shrikes, as the white
magpie ({Gymnorhina organicum}), the black magpie
({Strepera fuliginosa}), and the Australian magpie
({Cracticus picatus}).

{Magpie lark} (Zo["o]l.), a common Australian bird ({Grallina
picata}), conspicuously marked with black and white; --
called also {little magpie}.

{Magpie moth} (Zo["o]l.), a black and white European
geometrid moth ({Abraxas grossulariata}); the harlequin
moth. Its larva feeds on currant and gooseberry bushes.Abray \A*bray"\, v. [A false form from the preterit abraid,
abrayde.]
See {Abraid}. [Obs.] --Spenser.Abreaction \Ab`re*ac"tion\, n. [Pref. ab- + reaction, after G.
Abreagirung.] (Psychotherapy)
See {Catharsis}, below.Abreast \A*breast"\, adv. [Pref. a- + breast.]
1. Side by side, with breasts in a line; as, ``Two men could
hardly walk abreast.'' --Macaulay.

2. (Naut.) Side by side; also, opposite; over against; on a
line with the vessel's beam; -- with of.

3. Up to a certain level or line; equally advanced; as, to
keep abreast of [or with] the present state of science.

4. At the same time; simultaneously. [Obs.]

Abreast therewith began a convocation. --Fuller.Abregge \A*breg"ge\, v. t.
See {Abridge}. [Obs.]Abrenounce \Ab`re*nounce"\, v. t. [L. abrenuntiare; ab +
renuntiare. See {Renounce}.]
To renounce. [Obs.] ``They abrenounce and cast them off.''
--Latimer.Abrenunciation \Ab`re*nun`ci*a"tion\, n. [LL. abrenuntiatio. See
{Abrenounce}.]
Absolute renunciation or repudiation. [Obs.]

An abrenunciation of that truth which he so long had
professed, and still believed. --Fuller.Abreption \Ab*rep"tion\, n. [L. abreptus, p. p. of abripere to
snatch away; ab + rapere to snatch.]
A snatching away. [Obs.]Abreuvoir \A`breu`voir"\, n. [F., a watering place.] (Masonry)
The joint or interstice between stones, to be filled with
mortar. --Gwilt.Abricock \A"bri*cock\, n.
See {Apricot}. [Obs.]Abridge \A*bridge"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Abridged}; p. pr. &
vb. n. {Abridging}.] [OE. abregen, OF. abregier, F.
abr['e]ger, fr. L. abbreviare; ad + brevis short. See {Brief}
and cf. {Abbreviate}.]
1. To make shorter; to shorten in duration; to lessen; to
diminish; to curtail; as, to abridge labor; to abridge
power or rights. ``The bridegroom . . . abridged his
visit.'' --Smollett.

She retired herself to Sebaste, and abridged her
train from state to necessity. --Fuller.

2. To shorten or contract by using fewer words, yet retaining
the sense; to epitomize; to condense; as, to abridge a
history or dictionary.

3. To deprive; to cut off; -- followed by of, and formerly by
from; as, to abridge one of his rights.Abridge \A*bridge"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Abridged}; p. pr. &
vb. n. {Abridging}.] [OE. abregen, OF. abregier, F.
abr['e]ger, fr. L. abbreviare; ad + brevis short. See {Brief}
and cf. {Abbreviate}.]
1. To make shorter; to shorten in duration; to lessen; to
diminish; to curtail; as, to abridge labor; to abridge
power or rights. ``The bridegroom . . . abridged his
visit.'' --Smollett.

She retired herself to Sebaste, and abridged her
train from state to necessity. --Fuller.

2. To shorten or contract by using fewer words, yet retaining
the sense; to epitomize; to condense; as, to abridge a
history or dictionary.

3. To deprive; to cut off; -- followed by of, and formerly by
from; as, to abridge one of his rights.Abridger \A*bridg"er\, n.
One who abridges.Abridge \A*bridge"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Abridged}; p. pr. &
vb. n. {Abridging}.] [OE. abregen, OF. abregier, F.
abr['e]ger, fr. L. abbreviare; ad + brevis short. See {Brief}
and cf. {Abbreviate}.]
1. To make shorter; to shorten in duration; to lessen; to
dimin

chad at English => English (Computer) Of Explained:

to o.'s bow
то не хвана ДИКИШ it didn't workdictates
политика на ДИКТАТи a policy of dictationdictatordictatorialdictatorshipdictation
(упражнение) dictation exercise
пиша/записвам под ДИКТОВКАта на write/take down to s.o.'s dictation
можете ли да пишете под ДИКТОВКА? can you take dictation?
под ДИКТОВКАта на прен. at s.o.'s bidding/promptingannouncer; narrator, commentatorДИКТОРСКИ текст cdictate (на to)
(заповядвам) command, order
(налагам, изисквам) dictate, impose, demand
ДИКТУВАМ модата set the fashion
ДИКТУВАМ условия lay down/dictate conditions/termsdictation
ДИКТУВАНЕ на писма letter dic

chad at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

chad
n 1: a small piece of paper that is supposed to be removed when a
hole is punched in a card or paper tape
2: a lake in north central Africa; fed by the Shari river [syn:
{Lake Chad}]
3: a landlocked desert republic in north-central Africa; was
under French control until 1960 [syn: {Republic of Chad},
{Tchad}]
4: a family of Afroasiatic tonal languages (mostly two tones)
spoken in the regions west and south of Lake Chad in north
central Africa [syn: {Chadic}, {Chadic language}]

chad at Sanskrit => English (Monier-Williams) Of Explained:

chad

1[ chad ]1 cl. 1. [ °dati ] , to cover cf. Dhātup. xxxii , 41 ( v.l. )
: Caus. ( or cl. 10 ) [ chAd'ayati ] ( once [ ch'ad° ] cf. AitBr. i ,
30

---> [ chand° ] [ fr. √ 1. [ chand ] ] cf. Dhātup. xxxii , 41

---> ep. also Ā. , pf. [ chAdayAM ] [ cakre ] cf. R. iv , 58 , 7

---> p. [ °yAna ] cf. MBh. vi , 2430 ) , to cover , cover over ,
clothe , veil cf. RV. vi , 75 , 18 cf. AV. ix , 3 , 14 cf. TS. ii , v
cf. ŚBr. &c.

---> to spread as a cover cf. AitBr. i , 30

---> to cover one's self. cf. ChUp. i , 4 , 2

---> to hide , conceal , keep secret cf. MBh. cf. R. v , 90 , 16

---> to protect cf. ŚāṅkhGṛ. iii , 11 cf. PārGṛ. iii , 9 , 6 ( cf.
KāṭhGṛ. 47) : Caus. Desid. [ cicchAdayiSati ] cf. Pāṇ. 7-4 , 83 cf.
Vārtt. 2 cf. Pat. ; [ cf. Goth. [ scadus ]. ]

===============================================================================

chad

2[ chad ]2 mfn. ifc. ( cf. Pāṇ. 6-4 , 97 ) ` covering ' , See [ dhAma-
] and ( ? ) [ bhUte-cch'ad ] , [ mallikA- ]

---> cf. [ A- ]

===============================================================================

chad

2[ chad ]4 mfn. ifc. ` appearing as ' , See [ prathamacch'ad ]

---> , pleased with ' , See [ kavi- ] and ( ? ) [ bhUte-cch'ad ]

===============================================================================

chad

1[ chad ]3 or 2. [ chand ] , cl. 10. [ chad'ayati ] ( also [ °te ] = √
[ arc ] cf. Naigh. iii , 14 [ v. l , [ °ti ] ]

---> Subj. [ °yat ]cf. RV.

---> 2. pl. [ °yAtha ] , i , 165 , 12 ) , [ chandayati ] ( twice cl. i
[ ch'andati ] [ = [ arcati ] cf. Naigh. iii , 14 ] cf. MBh. xii

---> Ā. [ Subj. [ °yAte ]] cf. RV.

---> aor. [ acacchadat ] cf. Nir. ix , 8

---> [ acchAn ] cf. RV.

---> 2. pl. [ °nta ] , i , 165 , 12

---> 3. pl. [ °ntsur ] , x , 119 , 3

---> Subj. [ chantsat ] [ cf. Naigh. ii , 6 ] cf. RV.

---> 2. sg. [ °tsi ] , i , 163 , 4

---> perf. [ cacchanda ] , vii , 73 , 3

---> Pot. [ cacchadyAt ] , x , 73 , 9 ) to seem , appear , be
considered as cf. RV. cf. TāṇḍyaBr. xiv , 5

---> to seem good , please ( with dat. ) cf. RV. cf. ŚBr. viii

---> ( with acc. , ) cf. MBh. xii , 7379 ( cf. 7376 )

---> Ā. to be pleased with , delight in ( acc. or loc. ) cf. RV. viii
, 50 , 5 ; x , 27 , 8

---> [ chandayati ] , to gratify any one ( acc.

---> exceptionally gen. cf. MBh. xii , 7275 cf. R. iii , 3 , 15 ) with
anything ( instr. , esp. [ vareNa ] , ` with a boon '
cf. MBh. cf. Hariv. cf. R. cf. BhP. )

---> to try to seduce any one ( acc. ) cf. BhP. x , 45 , 36

===============================================================================

chad

1[ chad ]5 cl. 1. to nourish cf. Dhātup. xix

===============================================================================

Chad at English (WD) Of Explained:

Inter: also » chad

English

Inter: wikipedi » a

Pronunciation

* Inter: IPA » /tʃæd/
  • : Inter: rhymes » æd

    Etymology 1

    Inter: etyl » ang Inter: term » Ceadda|lang=ang, of obscure meaning; name of a seventh century saint, revived in the 20th century.

    Proper noun

    Inter: en-proper nou » n

  • Inter: given name » male|from=Old English. Also a modern nickname for Charles, Chadwick and similar-sounding names
    1. Inter: Britis » h The British version of the "Kilroy was here" graffiti.
      Quotations
      * 1993 Category: w - :Jonathan Kellerman|Jonathan Kellerman, Devils Waltz'', Random House 1998, ISBN 0345460715, page 26:

  • : "What else? Anyway, here's the genealogy: Charles Junior's only son is Charles the Third - like royalty. He goes by Chip - Cassie's daddy. The mom is Cindy. The dead son was Chad - Charles the Fourth."
  • : "All Cs," I said. "Sounds like they like order."
  • 1995 Category: w - :Hanif Kureishi|Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album, Faber and Faber, ISBN 0571150861, pages 88, 90
  • : 'He used to be called Trevor Buss.'
  • : 'Chad? I don't believe you.' - - -
  • : 'He changed his name into Muhammad Shahabuddin Ali-Shah.'
  • : 'No!'
  • : 'He'd insist on the whole name. He played football and his mates got fed up saying, "Pass the ball, Muhammad Shahabuddin Ali-Shah" - - - No one passed to him. So he became Chad.'

  • Category: Category:English diminutives of male given names -

    Etymology 2

    Believed to be from Kanuri tsade ("lake", after Category: w - :Lake Chad|Lake Chad)

    Proper noun

    Inter: en-proper nou » n
  • A country in Central Africa. Official name: Republic of Chad.
    Translations
    Inter: trans-top » country in central Africa
    • Arabic: Inter: t- » ar|تشاد|m|tr=tshaad
    • Armenian: Չադ (Čad)
    • Bengali: Inter: t- » bn|চাদ
    • Breton: Tchad
    • Catalan: Inter: t+ » ca|Txad|m
    • Chinese:
    • : Mandarin: Inter: t- » cmn|乍得|tr=Zhàdé|sc=Hani
    • Czech: Inter: t+ » cs|Čad|m
    • Danish: Inter: t+ » da|Tchad, Inter: t- » da|Republikken Tchad
    • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|Tsjaad
    • Esperanto: Inter: t- » eo|Ĉado
    • Estonian: Inter: t+ » et|Tšaad
    • Finnish: Inter: t+ » fi|Tšad
    • French: Inter: t+ » fr|Tchad
    • German: Inter: t+ » de|Tschad
    • Greek: Inter: t+ » el|Τσαντ
    • Hebrew: Inter: t- » he|צ'אד|tr=chad
    • Hungarian: Inter: t+ » hu|Csád
    • Icelandic: Inter: t+ » is|Tsjad|n
    • Interlingua: Inter: t- » ia|Chad
    • Irish: Inter: t- » ga|Sead|m
    • Italian: Inter: t- » it|Ciad
    • Japanese: Inter: t+ » ja|チャド|tr=Chado
    • Kalenjin: Inter: tø » kln|Chad
    • Kamba: Inter: tø » kam|Chad


    Inter: trans-mi » d
  • Khmer: Inter: t- » km|ឆាដ|tr=chard|sc=Khmr
  • Kikuyu: Inter: tø » ki|Chad
  • Korean: Inter: t+ » ko|차드|tr=Chadeu|sc=Hang
  • Limburgish: Inter: t- » li|Tchad
  • Luhya: Inter: tø » luy|Chad
  • Luo: Inter: tø » luo|Chad
  • Macedonian: Inter: t+ » mk|Чад|m|tr=Čad
  • Maltese: iċ-Ċadd
  • Meru: Inter: tø » mer|Chad
  • Norwegian: Inter: t+ » no|Tsjad
  • Persian: Inter: t- » fa|چاد|sc=fa-Arab
  • Polish: Inter: t+ » pl|Czad
  • Portuguese: Inter: t+ » pt|Chade
  • Romanian: Inter: t- » ro|Ciad|n
  • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|Чад|m|tr=Čad
  • Serbo-Croatian:
  • : Cyrillic: Inter: t- » sh|Чад|m|alt=Ча̑д|sc=Cyrl
  • : Roman: Inter: t- » sh|Čad|m|alt=Čȃd
  • Sicilian: Ciad {{m}}
  • Slovene: Inter: t+ » sl|Čad|alt=Čád|m
  • Spanish: Inter: t+ » es|Chad
  • Swahili: Inter: t+ » sw|Chadi
  • Swedish: Inter: t+ » sv|Tchad
  • Turkish: Inter: t+ » tr|Çad

  • Inter: trans-botto » m
    See also
    * Category: Appendix - :Countries of the world|Countries of the world
    Category: Category:en:Countries -

    Asturian

    Inter: wikipedia » lang=ast

    Proper noun

    Inter: ast-proper noun » m
  • Inter: l » en|Chad

  • Category: Category:ast:Countries -

    Spanish

    Inter: wikipedia » lang=es

    Proper noun

    Inter: es-proper nou » n
  • Chad

    Related terms

    * chadiano, chadiana

  • Category: Category:es:Countries -
    Category: ast:Chad -
    Translation: cs » Chad
    Translation: da » Chad
    Translation: de » Chad
    Translation: et » Chad
    Translation: el » Chad
    Translation: es » Chad
    Translation: fa » Chad
    Translation: fr » Chad
    Translation: fy » Chad
    Translation: gl » Chad
    Translation: ko » Chad
    Translation: hi » Chad
    Translation: hr » Chad
    Translation: io » Chad
    Translation: kn » Chad
    Translation: sw » Chad
    Translation: lt » Chad
    Translation: hu » Chad
    Translation: nl » Chad
    Translation: no » Chad
    Translation: nn » Chad
    Translation: oc » Chad
    Translation: pl » Chad
    Translation: pt » Chad
    Translation: ru » Chad
    Translation: sr » Chad
    Translation: fi » Chad
    Translation: tl » Chad
    Translation: ta » Chad
    Translation: tt » Chad
    Translation: tr » Chad
    Translation: uk » Chad
    Translation: zh » Chad

    chad at English (WD) Of Explained:

    Inter: also » Chad

    English

    Etymology

    Uncertain; predates the Chadless punch (see the Snopes article on this supposed origin); possibly from Inter: etyl » sco chad, "river gravel", or the English slang term chat, "louse".

    Pronunciation

    * Inter: rhymes » æd
    Inter: wikipedia » Chad (paper)

    Noun

    Inter: en-noun » chad|pl2=chads|-Category: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/new-words/041101-chad.htm Macmillan word of the day -
  • Inter: uncountabl » e Small pieces of paper punched out from the edges of continuous stationery, punched cards, paper tape etc.
    1. 2000, Barbara and David P. Mikkelson, Snopes.com, "Urban Legends Reference Pages"
    2. : The keypunch wasnt named after a Mr. Chadless; it was so named because, as expected, it punched tape while producing little or no chad.''
    3. Inter: countabl » e One of these pieces of paper.
    4. 1939 Ross A Lake, U.S. Patent 2,255,794, filed May 20, 1939
    5. : "Prior devices ... have been arranged to cut out the perforations completely ... thereby producing chads or waste material which often present difficult problems of disposal."[http://www.freepatentsonline.com/2255794.pdf]
    6. 1959, J. W. Freebody. Telegraphy.
    7. : The small hinged discs of paper, called ‘chad’, remain attached to the body of the tape.
    8. 2000, Supreme Court of the United States (per curiam). Bush v. Gore.
    9. : Much of the controversy seems to revolve around ballot cards designed to be perforated by a stylus but which, either through error or deliberate omission, have not been perforated with sufficient precision for a machine to count them. In some cases a piece of the card–a chad–is hanging, say by two corners. In other cases there is no separation at all, just an indentation.

      Derived terms

      * dimpled chad

  • hanging chad
  • pregnant chad
  • swinging-door chad
  • tri-chad

    See also

    *Category: Appendix:American Dialect Society words of the year -

    References


  • Middle English

    Etymology

    See ch-.

    Verb

    Inter: head » enm|verb form
  • I had

  • Palauan

    Noun

    Inter: head » pau|noun
  • person

  • Welsh

    Noun

    Inter: head » cy|noun form|g=f
  • Inter: mutation of » cad|lang=cy

  • Translation: et » chad
    Translation: gl » chad
    Translation: ko » chad
    Translation: io » chad
    Translation: fi » chad
    Translation: ta » chad
    Translation: vi » chad
    Translation: zh » chad