Online Dictionary

Edda Explained

Edda at English => English (English Etymology) Of Explained:

1771, by some identified with the name of the old woman in the O.N. poem "Rigs?¢®ul," by others derived from O.N. o?ur "spirit, mind, passion, song, poetry" (cognate with O.Ir. faith "poet," L. vates "seer, soothsayer"). It is the name given to two Icelandic books, the first a miscellany of poetry, mythology, and grammar by Snorri Sturluson (d.1241), since 1642 called the Younger or Prose Edda; and a c.1200 collection of ancient Gmc. poetry and religious tales, called the Elder or Poetic Edda. ///

Edda at English => English (The Britannica Concise) Of Explained:

Body of ancient Icelandic literature. Contained in two 13th-cent. books, it is the fullest and most detailed source for modern knowledge of Germanic mythology. The Prose Edda (or Younger Edda or Snorra-Edda; c.1222), a handbook on poetics by Snorri Sturluson, explains diction and meter in skaldic and Eddic poetry and recounts tales from Norse mythology. The Poetic Edda (Elder Edda, Sæ mundar Edda; c.1250-1300) is a collection of mythological and heroic poems of unknown authorship composed c.800-1100. These austere lays are the oldest surviving antecedents of the Nibelungenlied legends.

Edda at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Edda \Ed"da\, n.; pl. {Eddas}. [Icel., lit. great-grandmother
(i. e., of Scandinavian poetry), so called by Bishop
Brynj['u]lf Sveinsson, who brought it again to light in
1643.]
The religious or mythological book of the old Scandinavian
tribes of German origin, containing two collections of Sagas
(legends, myths) of the old northern gods and heroes.

Note: There are two Eddas. The older, consisting of 39 poems,
was reduced to writing from oral tradition in Iceland
between 1050 and 1133. The younger or {prose Edda},
called also the {Edda of Snorri}, is the work of
several writers, though usually ascribed to Snorri
Sturleson, who was born in 1178.

edda at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

edda
n 1: tropical starchy tuberous root [syn: {taro}, {taro root}, {cocoyam},
{dasheen}]
2: either of two distinct works in Old Icelandic dating from
the late 13th century and consisting of 34 mythological
and heroic ballads composed between 800 and 1200; the
primary source for Scandanavian mythology

Edda at English (WD) Of Explained:

==English==

Etymology

Inter: etyl » non|en Inter: term » edda||grandmother|lang=non

Proper noun

Inter: en-proper nou » n
  • A collection of Old Norse poems and tales from two medieval manuscripts found in Iceland.

    Derived terms

    * Poetic Edda
    • Prose Edda

      Anagrams

      * adde, Dade, dead


    Category: Category:en:Norse mythology -

    German

    Proper noun

    Inter: head » de|proper noun
  • Inter: Norse mythology » lang=de Edda.
    1. Inter: given name » female|lang=de, shortened from Inter: etyl » gem|de compound names beginning with Ed- or Edel-.


    Translation: de » Edda
    Translation: fr » Edda
    Translation: ko » Edda
    Translation: is » Edda
    Translation: it » Edda
    Translation: li » Edda
    Translation: ja » Edda
    Translation: ru » Edda
    Translation: sr » Edda

  • edda at English (WD) Of Explained:

    ==Swedish==

    Noun

    Inter: sv-noun » g=c
  • an Edda

    Declension

    Inter: sv-noun-reg-or » edd

  • Translation: nl » edda
    Translation: sv » edda
    Translation: ta » edda
    Translation: vi » edda

    Related words:

    Edda of Snorri  Eddaic  eddan  eddans  Eddas