Online Dictionary

Egypt Explained

egypt at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

['i:dʒəpt]

Egypt at English => English (English Etymology) Of Explained:

from Fr. Egypte, from Gk. Aigyptos "the river Nile, Egypt," from Amarna Hikuptah, corresponding to Egypt. Ha(t)-ka-ptah, one of the names of Memphis, the ancient city of Egypt. ///

Egypt at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

a country in northeast Africa, next to the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea. Population: 69,537,000 (2001). Capital: Cairo. //

Egypt at English => English (The Britannica Concise) Of Explained:

Republic, NE Africa. Area: 386,900 sq mi (1,002,070 sq km). Population (1997 est.): 62,110,000. Capital: Cairo. The people are mainly a homogeneous mix of Hamitic and Semitic lineages. Language: Arabic (official). Religion: Islam (official); minority, Coptic Christianity. Currency: Egyptian pound. Egypt occupies a crossroads between Africa, Europe, and Asia. The majority of its land is in the arid Western and Arabian deserts, separated by the country's dominant feature, the Nile River. The Nile forms a flat-bottomed valley, generally 5-10 mi (8-16 km) wide, that fans out into the densely populated delta lowlands north of Cairo. The Nile valley (Lower Egypt) and delta (Upper Egypt), along with scattered oases, support all of Egypt's agriculture and have more than 99% of its population. It has a developing, mainly socialist but partly free-enterprise economy, based primarily on industry, incl. petroleum production, and agriculture. It is a republic with one legislative house; its chief of state is the president, while the head of government is the prime minister. It is one of the world's oldest continuous civilizations. In c.3000 BC, Upper and Lower Egypt were united, beginning a period of cultural achievement and a line of native rulers that lasted nearly 3,000 years. Egypt's ancient history is divided into the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms, spanning 31 dynasties and lasting to 332 BC. The Pyramids date from the Old Kingdom; the cult of Osiris and the refinement of sculpture from the Middle Kingdom; the era of empire and the Exodus of the Jews from the New Kingdom. An Assyrian invasion occurred in the 7th cent. BC, and the Persian Achaemenids established a dynasty in 525 BC. The invasion by Alexander the Great in 332 BC inaugurated the Macedonian Ptolemaic period, and the ascendancy of Alexandria. The Romans held Egypt from 30 BC to AD 395; later it was placed under the control of Constantinople. Constantine's granting of tolerance in 313 to the Christians began the development of a formal Egyptian (Coptic) church. Egypt came under Arab control in 642, and ultimately was transformed into an Arabic-speaking state, with Islam as the dominant religion. Held by the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties, in 969 it became the center of the Fatimid dynasty. In 1250, the Mamluks established a dynasty that lasted until 1517 (see Mamluk regime), when Egypt fell to the Ottoman Turks. An economic decline ensued, and with it a decline in Egyptian culture. Egypt became a British protectorate in 1914 and received nominal independence in 1922, when a constitutional monarchy was established. A coup overthrew the monarchy in 1952, with G. A. Nasser taking power. Following three wars with Israel (see Arab-Israeli Wars), Egypt, under Nasser's successor, A. al-Sadat, ultimately played a leading role in Middle East peace talks. Sadat was succeeded by H. Mubarak, who followed Sadat's peace initiatives, and in 1982 regained Egyptian sovereignty (lost in 1967) over the Sinai Peninsula. Although Egypt took part in the coalition against Iraq during the Persian Gulf War (1991), it later began peace overtures with countries in the region, incl. Iraq.

Egypt at English => English (hitchcock) Of Explained:

inglybu4 de2 ren2 xin1not enjoy popular sup

Egypt at English => English (Eastons 1897 Bible) Of Explained:

bsurdity): absurdity, absurdness, imbecility, nonsense, paradox, aporia, inconsistency, blunder, muddle, farrago, disorder, chaos.

[N] (Solecism): solecism, bad grammar, faulty grammar, slip of the pen, slip of the tongue, barbarism, impropriety, goof, blunder.

[N] (Incompetence): incompetence, inability, inexperience, quackery, folly, stupidity, bungling, blundering

[N] (Incompetence): bungler, blunderer, duffer, quack.

[V] (Incompetence): blunder, bungle, fumble, botch, put one's foot in it, make a mess of.

[N] (Failure): failure, miscarriage, disappointment, blunder, mistake, fault, omission, miss, oversight, slip, trip, stumble, false step, misstep.[N] (Incompetence): bungler, blunderer, duffer, quack.[N] (Incompetence): incompetence, inability, inexperience, quackery, folly, stupidity, bungling, blundering.[ADJ] (Physical Inertness): inert, inactive, passive, torpid, sluggish, dull, heavy, flat, slack, tame, slow, blunt, unreactive, lifeless, dead, latent, dormant, smoldering.

[V] (Moderation): be moderate, settle down, keep the peace, relent, moderate, soften, mitigate, temper, mollify, blunt, subdue, chasten, lessen, decrease, check, palliate, tranquilize, pacify, assuage, appease, mellow.

[V] (Bluntness): be blunt, render blunt, dull, take off the edge, turn.

[ADJ] (Bluntness): blunt, obtuse, dull, matt.

[V] (Insensitivity): be insensitive, have a thick skin, render insensible, blunt, pall, benumb, paralyze, stupefy, stun.

[V] (Dissuasion): dissuade, cry out against, remonstrate, warn, contraindicate, disincline, indispose, discourage, dishearten, deter, repress, hold back, keep back, restrain, check, hinder, blunt, calm.

[V] (Insensivity): be insensitive, blunt, numb, benumb, paralyze, deaden, stun, stupefy, brutalize.[V] (Impurity): be unclean, rot, putrefy, ferment, fester, rankle, reek, stink, mold, molder, go bad, daub, blot, blur, smudge, soil, smoke, tarnish, spot, smear, spatter, besmear.[V] (Speech): speak, say, utter, pronounce, give voice to, blurt out, have at the tip of one's tongue, put in a word, hold forth, make a speech, deliver a speech, speechify, harangue, declaim.[V] (Red): be red, blush, flush, redden, rubricate.[ADJ] (Modesty): modest, diffident, humble, timid, timorous, bashful, shy, nervous, skittish, coy, sheepish, shamefaced, blushing, unobtrusive, unassuming, unostentatious, humbled, reserved, demure.[N] (Violence): violence, vehemence, might, impetuosity, boisterousness, turbulence, bluster, uproar, severity, ferocity, rage, fury, exacerbation, exasperation, malignity, fit, paroxysm, orgasm, climax, force.

[ADJ] (Violence): violent, vehement, rough, rude, wild, impetuous, rampant, turbulent, disorderly, blustering, raging, riotous, tumultuous, obstreperous, uproarious, extravagant, tameless, frenzied, insane.

[V] (Defiance): defy, dare, scorn, disobey, bluster, threaten, challenge, throw down the gauntlet.

[N] (Insolence): insolence, haughtiness, arrogance, airs, impertinence, flippancy, petulance, bluster, swagger, impudence, audacity, shamelessness, effrontery.

[V] (Insolence): be insolent, bluster, swagger, swell, make bold, snub.

[N] (Insolence): insolence, haughtiness, arrogance, airs, impertinence, flippancy, petulance, bluster, swagger, impudence, audacity, shamelessness, effrontery[ADJ] (Violence): violent, vehement, rough, rude, wild, impetuous, rampant, turbulent, disorderly, blustering, raging, riotous, tumultuous, obstreperous, uproarious, extravagant, tameless, frenzied, insane.

[ADJ] (Wind): blowing, windy, flatulent, breezy, gusty, squally, stormy, tempestuous, blustering.[N] (Council): council, committee, subcommittee, board, staff, parliament, chamber, directory, house, legislative assembly, chapter.

[N] (Attack): attack, assault, onset, onslaught, charge, aggression, offense, incursion, inroad, invasion, outbreak, sally, sortie, raid, foray, storming, boarding, siege, bombardment.

[V] (Attack): attack, assault, assail, invade, charge, impugn, besiege, offend, storm, board, bombard.

[N] (Tribunal): tribunal, court, board, bench, court of justice, court of law, inquisition.[N] (Attack): attack, assault, onset, onslaught, charge, aggression, offense, incursion, inroad, invasion, outbreak, sally, sortie, raid, foray, storming, boarding, siege, bombardment.[V] (Rejoicing): rejoice, congratulate, exult, boast, celebrate, make merry.

[V] (Affectation): affect, put on airs, boast, pose.

[V] (Reputation): be proud of, exult, boast, be vain of, vanity.

[V] (Vanity): be vain, pride oneself, give oneself airs, assume, boast.

[ADJ] (Vanity): vain, conceited, vainglorious, puffed up, inflated, self-satisfied, self-sufficient, pretentious, priggish, egotistic, egotistical,

[N] (Boasting): boasting, boast, pretensions, puffery, bluff, hot air, bragging, showing off, bravado, rodomontade, bombast, braggadocio, exaggeration, vanity.

[V] (Boasting): boast, brag, vaunt, show off, swagger, bluff, crow.

[ADJ] (Boasting): boasting, bragging, boastful, pretentious, vainglorious, conceited.

[N] (Boasting): boasting, boast, pretensions, puffery, bluff, hot air, bragging, showing off, bravado, rodomontade, bombast, braggadocio, exaggeration, vanity.

[V] (Boasting): boast, brag, vaunt, show off, swagger, bluff, crow.

[ADJ] (Boasting): boasting, bragging, boastful, pretentious, vainglorious, conceited.[ADJ] (Vanity): vain, conceited, vainglorious, puffed up, inflated, self-satisfied, self-sufficient, pretentious, priggish, egotistic, egotistical, boastful.

[ADJ] (Boasting): boasting, bragging, boastful, pretentious, vainglorious, conceited.[N] (Exaggeration): exaggeration, expansion, hyperbole, caricature, extravagance, boasting, grandiloquence.

[N] (Boasting): boasting, boast, pretensions, puffery, bluff, hot air, bragging, showing off, bravado, rodomontade, bombast, braggadocio, exaggeration, vanity.

[ADJ] (Boasting): boasting, bragging, boastful, pretentious, vainglorious, conceited.

[N] (Boasting): boasting, boast, pretensions, puffery, bluff, hot air, bragging, showing off, bravado, rodomontade, bombast, braggadocio, exaggeration, vanity.

[ADJ] (Boasting): boasting, bragging, boastful, pretentious, vainglorious, conceited.[N] (Ship): ship, vessel, boat, oceanliner, cruise ship, sailboat, craft, airship, airplane, plane, rocket, spacecraft, shuttle, space shuttle.[N] (Navigation): navigation, boating, yachting, aeronautics, balloon, ballooning, aviation, space travel, astronautics.[N] (Sailor): sailor, mariner, navigator, seaman, seafarer, seafaring man, old salt*, marine, midshipman, skipper, gondolier, oarsman, boatswain, coxswain.[V] (Leap): leap, jump, hop, spring, bound, vault, ramp, caper, trip, skip, dance, buck, bob, bounce.[V] (Prediction): predict, prognosticate, prophesy, vaticinate, divine, foretell, soothsay, forewarn, presage, augur, bode, forebode, foretoken, betoken, prefigure, portend, foreshadow, herald.[ADJ] (Substantiality): substantive, substantial, essential, personal, bodily, tangible, material, corporeal

[ADV] (Substantiality): substantially, bodily, essentially.

[ADJ] (Substantiality): substantive, substantial, essential, personal, bodily, tangible, material, corporeal.

[ADV] (Substantiality): substantially, bodily, essentially.

[ADJ] (Materiality): material, bodily, corporeal, corporal, physical, somatic, sensible, tangible, ponderable, palpable, substantial, objective, impersonal.[N] (Substantiality): substantiality, hypostasis, person, being, thing, object, article, item, something, a being, an existence, creature, body, substance, flesh and blood, stuff, substratum, matter, element, essential nature, groundwork, materiality, substantialness, vital part.

[N] (Whole): {Principal part}: bulk, mass, lump, tissue, staple, body, trunk, torso, hull, hulk, skeleton greater part, major part, best part, principal part, main part, essential part, importance, lion's share, the long and the short, nearly, all, almost all.

[V] (Whole): form a whole, constitute a whole, integrate, embody, amass, aggregate, assemble, amount to, come to.

[ADV] (Whole): wholly, altogether, totally, completely, entirely, all, all in all, as a whole, wholesale, in a body, collectively, all put together, in the aggregate, in the lump, in the main, in the long run, en masse, as a body, on the whole, en bloc, in extenso , throughout, every inch, substantially.

[N] (Assemblage): {Group}: crowd, throng, group, flood, rush, deluge, rabble, mob, press, horde, body, tribe, crew, gang, knot, squad, band, party, swarm, shoal, school, covey, flock, herd, drove, bunch, drive, force, roundup , array, bevy, galaxy, corps, company, troop, troupe, task force, army, regiment, combatants, host, multitude, clan, brotherhood, fraternity, sorority, association, party, volley, storm, cloud, group, cluster, clump.

[N] (Materiality): materiality, substantiality, substantialness, flesh and blood, matter, body, substance, stuff, element, principle, corpus, object, article, thing, something.[N] (Guard): keeper, custodian, ranger, warder, jailer, turnkey, guard, watchdog, watchman, sentry, sentinel, concierge, coast guard, game keeper, escort, bodyguard, protector, duenna, guardian, governess.[N] (Marsh): marsh, swamp, morass, moss, fen, bog, quagmire, slough, mud, squash.

[ADJ] (Marsh): marsh, marshy, swampy, boggy, soft, muddy, sloppy, squashy, moorish, moory, fenny.[ADJ] (Marsh): marsh, marshy, swampy, boggy, soft, muddy, sloppy, squashy, moorish, moory, fenny.[ADJ] (Deception): deceiving, cunning, deceptive, deceitful, illusory, elusive, insidious, untrue, mock, sham, make-believe, counterfeit, pseudo, spurious, feigned, trumped up, bogus, fraudulent, tricky, false, fabricated, forged, fictive.[N] (Traveler): traveler, wayfarer, voyager, itinerant, passenger, commuter, tourist, explorer, adventurer, mountaineer, hiker, backpacker, wanderer, rover, rambler, vagrant, tramp, hobo, vagabond, nomad, Bohemian, gypsy.[V] (Vaporization): render gaseous, vaporize, evaporate, exhale, fume, smoke, steam, effervesce, boil, mist, spray.

[ADJ] (Vaporization): volatilized, volatile, vaporizable, bubbly, effervescent,

[V] (Heat): be hot, glow, flush, swelter, boil, burn, blister, broil, blaze, flame, smolder, heat.

[V] (Excitability): be impatient, chafe, fidget, fuss, burn, boil, itch.[ADJ] (Vaporization): volatilized, volatile, vaporizable, b

Egypt at English = English (world95) Of Explained:

with others;
to give one's adhesion. Hence, to agree or assent to a
proposal or a view; as, he acceded to my request.

The treaty of Hanover in 1725 . . . to which the
Dutch afterwards acceded. --Chesterfield.

Syn: To agree; assent; consent; comply; acquiesce; concur.Accelerando \Ac*cel`er*an"do\, a. [It.] (Mus.)
Gradually accelerating the movement.Accelerate \Ac*cel"er*ate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accelerated};
p. pr. & vb. n. {Accelerating}.] [L. acceleratus, p. p. of
accelerare; ad + celerare to hasten; celer quick. See
{Celerity}.]
1. To cause to move faster; to quicken the motion of; to add
to the speed of; -- opposed to {retard}.

2. To quicken the natural or ordinary progression or process
of; as, to accelerate the growth of a plant, the increase
of wealth, etc.

3. To hasten, as the occurence of an event; as, to accelerate
our departure.

{Accelerated motion} (Mech.), motion with a continually
increasing velocity.

{Accelerating force}, the force which causes accelerated
motion. --Nichol.

Syn: To hasten; expedite; quicken; dispatch; forward;
advance; further.Accelerate \Ac*cel"er*ate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accelerated};
p. pr. & vb. n. {Accelerating}.] [L. acceleratus, p. p. of
accelerare; ad + celerare to hasten; celer quick. See
{Celerity}.]
1. To cause to move faster; to quicken the motion of; to add
to the speed of; -- opposed to {retard}.

2. To quicken the natural or ordinary progression or process
of; as, to accelerate the growth of a plant, the increase
of wealth, etc.

3. To hasten, as the occurence of an event; as, to accelerate
our departure.

{Accelerated motion} (Mech.), motion with a continually
increasing velocity.

{Accelerating force}, the force which causes accelerated
motion. --Nichol.

Syn: To hasten; expedite; quicken; dispatch; forward;
advance; further.Accelerate \Ac*cel"er*ate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accelerated};
p. pr. & vb. n. {Accelerating}.] [L. acceleratus, p. p. of
accelerare; ad + celerare to hasten; celer quick. See
{Celerity}.]
1. To cause to move faster; to quicken the motion of; to add
to the speed of; -- opposed to {retard}.

2. To quicken the natural or ordinary progression or process
of; as, to accelerate the growth of a plant, the increase
of wealth, etc.

3. To hasten, as the occurence of an event; as, to accelerate
our departure.

{Accelerated motion} (Mech.), motion with a continually
increasing velocity.

{Accelerating force}, the force which causes accelerated
motion. --Nichol.

Syn: To hasten; expedite; quicken; dispatch; forward;
advance; further.Accelerate \Ac*cel"er*ate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accelerated};
p. pr. & vb. n. {Accelerating}.] [L. acceleratus, p. p. of
accelerare; ad + celerare to hasten; celer quick. See
{Celerity}.]
1. To cause to move faster; to quicken the motion of; to add
to the speed of; -- opposed to {retard}.

2. To quicken the natural or ordinary progression or process
of; as, to accelerate the growth of a plant, the increase
of wealth, etc.

3. To hasten, as the occurence of an event; as, to accelerate
our departure.

{Accelerated motion} (Mech.), motion with a continually
increasing velocity.

{Accelerating force}, the force which causes accelerated
motion. --Nichol.

Syn: To hasten; expedite; quicken; dispatch; forward;
advance; further.Accelerate \Ac*cel"er*ate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accelerated};
p. pr. & vb. n. {Accelerating}.] [L. acceleratus, p. p. of
accelerare; ad + celerare to hasten; celer quick. See
{Celerity}.]
1. To cause to move faster; to quicken the motion of; to add
to the speed of; -- opposed to {retard}.

2. To quicken the natural or ordinary progression or process
of; as, to accelerate the growth of a plant, the increase
of wealth, etc.

3. To hasten, as the occurence of an event; as, to accelerate
our departure.

{Accelerated motion} (Mech.), motion with a continually
increasing velocity.

{Accelerating force}, the force which causes accelerated
motion. --Nichol.

Syn: To hasten; expedite; quicken; dispatch; forward;
advance; further.Acceleration \Ac*cel`er*a"tion\, n. [L. acceleratio: cf. F.
acc['e]l['e]ration.]
The act of accelerating, or the state of being accelerated;
increase of motion or action; as, a falling body moves toward
the earth with an acceleration of velocity; -- opposed to
{retardation}.

A period of social improvement, or of intellectual
advancement, contains within itself a principle of
acceleration. --I. Taylor.
(Astr. & Physics.)

{Acceleration of the moon}, the increase of the moon's mean
motion in its orbit, in consequence of which its period of
revolution is now shorter than in ancient times.

{Acceleration} and {retardation of the tides}. See {Priming
of the tides}, under {Priming}.

{Diurnal acceleration of the fixed stars}, the amount by
which their apparent diurnal motion exceeds that of the
sun, in consequence of which they daily come to the
meridian of any place about three minutes fifty-six
seconds of solar time earlier than on the day preceding.


{Acceleration of the planets}, the increasing velocity of
their motion, in proceeding from the apogee to the perigee
of their orbits.

Acceleration \Ac*cel`er*a"tion\, n. [L. acceleratio: cf. F.
acc['e]l['e]ration.]
The act of accelerating, or the state of being accelerated;
increase of motion or action; as, a falling body moves toward
the earth with an acceleration of velocity; -- opposed to
{retardation}.

A period of social improvement, or of intellectual
advancement, contains within itself a principle of
acceleration. --I. Taylor.
(Astr. & Physics.)

{Acceleration of the moon}, the increase of the moon's mean
motion in its orbit, in consequence of which its period of
revolution is now shorter than in ancient times.

{Acceleration} and {retardation of the tides}. See {Priming
of the tides}, under {Priming}.

{Diurnal acceleration of the fixed stars}, the amount by
which their apparent diurnal motion exceeds that of the
sun, in consequence of which they daily come to the
meridian of any place about three minutes fifty-six
seconds of solar time earlier than on the day preceding.


{Acceleration of the planets}, the increasing velocity of
their motion, in proceeding from the apogee to the perigee
of their orbits.Acceleration \Ac*cel`er*a"tion\, n. [L. acceleratio: cf. F.
acc['e]l['e]ration.]
The act of accelerating, or the state of being accelerated;
increase of motion or action; as, a falling body moves toward
the earth with an acceleration of velocity; -- opposed to
{retardation}.

A period of social improvement, or of intellectual
advancement, contains within itself a principle of
acceleration. --I. Taylor.
(Astr. & Physics.)

{Acceleration of the moon}, the increase of the moon's mean
motion in its orbit, in consequence of which its period of
revolution is now shorter than in ancient times.

{Acceleration} and {retardation of the tides}. See {Priming
of the tides}, under {Priming}.

{Diurnal acceleration of the fixed stars}, the amount by
which their apparent diurnal motion exceeds that of the
sun, in consequence of which they daily come to the
meridian of any place about three minutes fifty-six
seconds of solar time earlier than on the day preceding.


{Acceleration of the planets}, the increasing velocity of
their motion, in proceeding from the apogee to the perigee
of their orbits.Acceleration \Ac*cel`er*a"tion\, n. [L. acceleratio: cf. F.
acc['e]l['e]ration.]
The act of accelerating, or the state of being accelerated;
increase of motion or action; as, a falling body moves toward
the earth with an acceleration of velocity; -- opposed to
{retardation}.

A period of social improvement, or of intellectual
advancement, contains within itself a principle of
acceleration. --I. Taylor.
(Astr. & Physics.)

{Acceleration of the moon}, the increase of the moon's mean
motion in its orbit, in consequence of which its period of
revolution is now shorter than in ancient times.

{Acceleration} and {retardation of the tides}. See {Priming
of the tides}, under {Priming}.

{Diurnal acceleration of the fixed stars}, the amount by
which their apparent diurnal motion exceeds that of the
sun, in consequence of which they daily come to the
meridian of any place about three minutes fifty-six
seconds of solar time earlier than on the day preceding.


{Acceleration of the planets}, the increasing velocity of
their motion, in proceeding from the apogee to the perigee
of their orbits.Parallelogram \Par`al*lel"o*gram\, n. [Gr. ?; ? parallel + ? to
write: cf. F. parall['e]logramme. See {Parallel}, and
{-gram}.] (Geom.)
A right-lined quadrilateral figure, whose opposite sides are
parallel, and consequently equal; -- sometimes restricted in
popular usage to a rectangle, or quadrilateral figure which
is longer than it is broad, and with right angles.

{Parallelogram of velocities}, {forces}, {accelerations},
{momenta}, etc. (Mech.), a parallelogram the diagonal of
which represents the resultant of two velocities, forces,
accelerations, momenta, etc., both in quantity and
direction, when the velocities, forces, accelerations,
momenta, etc., are represented in quantity and direction
by the two adjacent sides of the parallelogram.Accelerative \Ac*cel"er*a*tive\, a.
Relating to acceleration; adding to velocity; quickening.
--Reid.Accelerator \Ac*cel"er*a`tor\, n.
One who, or that which, accelerates. Also as an adj.; as,
accelerator nerves.Acceleratory \Ac*cel"er*a*to*ry\, a.
Accelerative.Accelerograph \Ac*cel"er*o*graph\, n. [Accelerate + -graph.]
(Mil.)
An apparatus for studying the combustion of powder in guns,
etc.Accelerometer \Ac*cel`er*om"e*ter\, n. [Accelerate + -meter.]
An apparatus for measuring the velocity imparted by
gunpowder.Accend \Ac*cend"\, v. t. [L. accendere, accensum, to kindle; ad
+ cand[e^]re to kindle (only in compounds); rel. to
cand[=e]re to be white, to gleam. See {Candle}.]
To set on fire; to kindle. [Obs.] --Fotherby.Accendibility \Ac*cend`i*bil"i*ty\, n.
Capacity of being kindled, or of becoming inflamed;
inflammability.Accendible \Ac*cend"i*ble\, a.
Capable of being inflamed or kindled; combustible;
inflammable. --Ure.Accension \Ac*cen"sion\, n.
The act of kindling or the state of being kindled; ignition.
--Locke.Accensor \Ac*cen"sor\, n. [LL., from p. p. accensus. See
{Accend}.] (R. C. Ch.)
One of the functionaries who light and trim the tapers.Accent \Ac"cent`\, n. [F. accent, L. accentus; ad + cantus a
singing, canere to sing. See {Cant}.]
1. A superior force of voice or of articulative effort upon
some particular syllable of a word or a phrase,
distinguishing it from the others.

Note: Many English words have two accents, the primary and
the secondary; the primary being uttered with a greater
stress of voice than the secondary; as in as'pira"tion,
where the chief stress is on the third syllable, and a
slighter stress on the first. Some words, as
an'tiap'o-plec"tic, in-com'pre-hen'si-bil"i-ty, have
two secondary accents. See Guide to Pron., [th][th]
30-46.

2. A mark or character used in writing, and serving to
regulate the pronunciation; esp.:
(a) a mark to indicate the nature and place of the spoken
accent;
(b) a mark to indicate the quality of sound of the vowel
marked; as, the French accents.

Note: In the ancient Greek the acute accent (') meant a
raised tone or pitch, the grave (`), the level tone or
simply the negation of accent, the circumflex ( ~ or ^)
a tone raised and then depressed. In works on
elocution, the first is often used to denote the rising
inflection of the voice; the second, the falling
inflection; and the third (^), the compound or waving
inflection. In dictionaries, spelling books, and the
like, the acute accent is used to designate the
syllable which receives the chief stress of voice.

3. Modulation of the voice in speaking; manner of speaking or
pronouncing; peculiar or characteristic modification of
the voice; tone; as, a foreign accent; a French or a
German accent. ``Beguiled you in a plain accent.'' --Shak.
``A perfect accent.'' --Thackeray.

The tender accent of a woman's cry. --Prior.

4. A word; a significant tone; (pl.) expressions in general;
speech.

Winds! on your wings to Heaven her accents bear,
Such words as Heaven alone is fit to hear. --Dryden.

5. (Pros.) Stress laid on certain syllables of a verse.

6. (Mus.)
(a) A regularly recurring stress upon the tone to mark the
beginning, and, more feebly, the third part of the
measure.
(b) A special emphasis of a tone, even in the weaker part
of the measure.
(c) The rhythmical accent, which marks phrases and
sections of a period.
(d) The expressive emphasis and shading of a passage. --J.
S. Dwight.

7. (Math.)
(a) A mark placed at the right hand of a letter, and a
little above it, to distinguish magnitudes of a
similar kind expressed by the same letter, but
differing in value, as y', y[sec].
(b) (Trigon.) A mark at the right hand of a number,
indicating minutes of a degree, seconds, etc.; as,
12'27[sec], i. e., twelve minutes twenty seven
seconds.
(c) (Engin.) A mark used to denote feet and inches; as, 6'
10[sec] is six feet ten inches.

Accent \Ac*cent"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accented}; p. pr. & vb.

Egypt at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

Egypt
n 1: a republic in northeastern Africa known as the United Arab
Republic until 1971; site of an ancient civilization
that flourished from 2600 to 30 BC [syn: {Arab Republic
of Egypt}, {United Arab Republic}]
2: an ancient empire west of Israel; centered on the Nile River
and ruled by a Pharaoh; figured in many events described
in the Old Testament [syn: {Egyptian Empire}]

Egypt at English (WD) Of Explained:

==English==
Inter: wikipedi » a

Alternative forms

* Ægypt Inter: qualifier » archaic

Etymology

From Inter: etyl » frm Inter: term » Egypte|lang=frm, from Inter: etyl » la Inter: term » Ægyptus|lang=la, from Inter: etyl » grc Inter: term » sc=polytonic|Αἴγυπτος|tr=Aígyptos, from Inter: etyl » gmy *aikupitos (nb. {{term|