Online Dictionary

abscission Explained

Abscission at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

or the debt. In England, a payment to the sheriff
or other officer having the ca. sa., is no payment to the plaintiff. Freem.
842 Lutw. 587; 2 Lev. 203; 1 Arch. Pr. 278. The law is different in
Pennsylvania. 3 Serg. & Rawle, 467. The return made by the officer is either
C. C. & C., cepi corpus et comittitur, if the defendant have been arrested
and held in custody; or N. E. I., non est inventus, if the officer has not
been able to find him. T

abscission at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

{Ethernet address} from its {Internet address}. The sender
broadcasts an ARP {packet} containing the {Internet address}
of another host and waits for it (

abscission at English (WD) Of Explained:

==English==

Etymology

From Inter: etyl » la Inter: term » abscissio|lang=la, from Inter: term » abscindo||to cut or tear|lang=la.

Pronunciation

* Inter: a » US Inter: IPA » /æbˈsɪ.ʃn̩/|/æbˈsɪ.ʒn̩/

Noun

Inter: wikipedi » a
Inter: examples-right » sense=rhetoric|examples=He is a man of so much honor and candor, and of such generosity -- but I need say no more.
Inter: en-nou » n
  • The act or process of cutting off.Inter: defdate » First attested in the early 17th century.Inter: reference-book » last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =Brown, Lesley | others = | title = The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =Oxford University Press | location =Oxford, UK | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =
    1. 1859, Category: w - :Jeremy Taylor|Jeremy Taylor, The sermons of the Right Rev. Jeremy Taylor: Complete in one volume, page 286:
    2. : Not to be cured without the abscission of a member.
    3. Inter: obsolet » e The state of being cut off.Inter: defdate » Attested only in the mid 17th century.
    4. Inter: context » rhetoric A figure of speech employed when a speaker having begun to say a thing stops abruptly
    5. Inter: context » botany The natural separation of a part at a predetermined location, such as a leaf at the base of the petiole.Inter: defdate » First attested in the late 19th century.

      Usage notes

      Not to be confused with abscision, which only is defined as the first sense.

      Related terms

      * abscise

  • abscisic
  • abscisic acid
  • abscisin, abscissin

    Translations

    Inter: trans-top » act of cutting off
  • Greek: Inter: t+ » el|εκτομή|f|tr=ektomí|sc=Grek

  • Inter: trans-mi » d
    • Spanish: Inter: t+ » es|abscisión|f


    Inter: trans-botto » m

    References

    Anagrams

    * abscisions

    French

    Noun

    Inter: fr-noun » f
  • Inter: botan » y abscission

  • Translation: et » abscission
    Translation: el » abscission
    Translation: fr » abscission
    Translation: ko » abscission
    Translation: io » abscission
    Translation: id » abscission
    Translation: kn » abscission
    Translation: ku » abscission
    Translation: hu » abscission
    Translation: mg » abscission
    Translation: nl » abscission
    Translation: pl » abscission
    Translation: ru » abscission
    Translation: ta » abscission
    Translation: vi » abscission
    Translation: zh » abscission