Online Dictionary

chancellor Explained

chancellor at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

['tʃænsələ]

chancellor at English => English (English Etymology) Of Explained:

c.1131 (a variant form existed in O.E.), from O.Fr. chancelier, from L.L. cancellarius "keeper of the barrier, secretary, usher of a law court," so called because he worked behind a lattice at a basilica or law court (see chancel). In the Roman Empire, a sort of court usher; the post gradually gained importance in the Western kingdoms. ///

chancellor at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

W3 n [C] [Date: 1000-1100; Language: Old French; Origin: chancelier, from Late Latin cancellarius 'doorkeeper, secretary', from cancellus; CHANCEL]//
1 the Chancellor of the Exchequer:
2 : a) the person who officially represents a British university on special occasions// b) the person in charge of some American universities//
3 the leader of the government or the main government minister of some countries: --Helmut Kohl, the former German Chancellor//

chancellor at English => English (The Britannica Concise) Of Explained:

In Western Europe, the title of holders of numerous offices of varying importance, ultimately political in nature. The prime ministers of Germany and Austria are called chancellors. In Britain, the chancellor of the exchequer is the cabinet member in charge of finance. In the U.S., the title is found mostly among the chief administrators of universities.

chancellor at English => English (Moby Thesaurus II) Of Explained:

121 Moby Thesaurus words for "chancellor":
JA, academic dean, administration, administrator, alderman,
ambassador, ambassadress, amicus curiae, apostolic delegate,
archon, assessor, attache, bailie, barmaster, burghermaster,
burgomaster, cabinet member, cabinet minister, career diplomat,
charge, chief executive, chief executive officer, chief of state,
circuit judge, city councilman, city father, city manager,
commercial attache, commissar, commissioner, consul,
consul general, consular agent, councillor, councilman,
councilwoman, county commissioner, county supervisor, dean,
dean of men, dean of women, dewan, diplomat, diplomatic,
diplomatic agent, diplomatist, doge, elder, emissary, envoy,
envoy extraordinary, executive, executive director,
executive officer, executive secretary, foreign service officer,
grand vizier, head of state, headman, headmaster, headmistress,
induna, internuncio, judge advocate, judge ordinary, jurat,
justice in eyre, justice of assize, lay judge, legal assessor,
legate, legislator, lord mayor, magistrate, maire, management,
managing director, master, mayor, military attache, military judge,
minister, minister of state, minister plenipotentiary,
minister resident, nuncio, officer, official, ombudsman, ordinary,
plenipotentiary, police judge, portreeve, prefect, premier,
president, presiding judge, prexy, prime minister, principal,
probate judge, provost, puisne judge, recorder, rector, reeve,
resident, secretary, secretary of legation, secretary of state,
selectman, supervisor, syndic, the administration, treasurer,
undersecretary, vice-chancellor, vice-consul, vice-legate,
vice-president, warden

Chancellor at English => English (Eastons 1897 Bible) Of Explained:

rically opposed, as different as black and white, as different as night and day, quite the contrary, quite the reverse.

[ADJ] (Discord): dis

chancellor at English => English (Oxford Advanced Learners) Of Explained:

(also Chancellor) noun (often used in a title)
1 the head of government in Germany or Austria:
Chancellor Schroder
2 (BrE) = CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER:
MPs waited for the chancellor's announcement. * the Shadow Chancellor Francis Maude
3 the official head of a university in Britain. Chancellor is an HONORARY title.
compare VICE CHANCELLOR
4 the head of some American universities
5 used in the titles of some senior state officials in Britain:
the Lord Chancellor (= a senior law official)

CHANCELLOR at English => English (Bouviers Law) Of Explained:

and methods of physics to study biologynoun
(informal) a film/movie about the life of a particular person:
a political biopic about President Kennedynoun
(plural biopsies) the removal and examination of tissue from the body of sb who is ill, in order to find out more about their diseasenoun
[usually pl.] the changing pattern of how physical processes happen in the body, that some people believe affects human behaviournoun
[sing.] (technical) the part of the earth's surface and atmosphere in which plants and animals can livenoun
[U] (technical) the use of living cells and bacteria in industrial and scientific processes
biotechnological adjective:
biotechnological researchadjective
(written) involving two political parties:
a bipartisan policy * The Bill before Congress has bipartisan support.noun
(technical) any creature with two feet
compare QUADRUPEDnoun
an early type of plane with two sets of wings, one above the other
compare MONOPLANEnoun
1 [C, U] (also birch tree [C]) a tree with smooth bark and thin branches, that grows in northern countries
see also SILVER BIRCH
2 (also birchwood ) [U] the hard pale wood of the birch tree
3 (the birch) [sing.] the practice of hitting sb with a bunch of birch sticks, as a punishmentnoun

1 a creature that is covered with feathers and has two wings and two legs. Most birds can fly:
a bird's nest with two eggs in it * a species of bird * The area has a wealth of bird life. * More than a third of Britain's bird species need urgent

Chancellor at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Chancellor \Chan"cel*lor\, n. [OE. canceler, chaunceler, F.
chancelier, LL. cancellarius chancellor, a director of
chancery, fr. L. cancelli lattices, crossbars, which
surrounded the seat of judgment. See {Chancel}.]
A judicial court of chancery, which in England and in the
United States is distinctively a court with equity
jurisdiction.

Note: The chancellor was originally a chief scribe or
secretary under the Roman emperors, but afterward was
invested with judicial powers, and had superintendence
over the other officers of the empire. From the Roman
empire this office passed to the church, and every
bishop has his chancellor, the principal judge of his
consistory. In later times, in most countries of
Europe, the chancellor was a high officer of state,
keeper of the great seal of the kingdom, and having the
supervision of all charters, and like public
instruments of the crown, which were authenticated in
the most solemn manner. In France a secretary is in
some cases called a chancellor. In Scotland, the
appellation is given to the foreman of a jury, or
assize. In the present German empire, the chancellor is
the president of the federal council and the head of
the imperial administration. In the United States, the
title is given to certain judges of courts of chancery
or equity, established by the statutes of separate
States. --Blackstone. Wharton.

{Chancellor} {of a bishop, or of a diocese} (R. C. Ch. & ch.
of Eng.), a law officer appointed to hold the bishop's
court in his diocese, and to assist him in matter of
ecclesiastical law.

{Chancellor of a cathedral}, one of the four chief
dignitaries of the cathedrals of the old foundation, and
an officer whose duties are chiefly educational, with
special reference to the cultivation of theology.

{Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster}, an officer before
whom, or his deputy, the court of the duchy chamber of
Lancaster is held. This is a special jurisdiction.

{Chancellor of a university}, the chief officer of a
collegiate body. In Oxford, he is elected for life; in
Cambridge, for a term of years; and his office is
honorary, the chief duties of it devolving on the vice
chancellor.

{Chancellor of the exchequer}, a member of the British
cabinet upon whom devolves the charge of the public income
and expenditure as the highest finance minister of the
government.

{Chancellor of the order of the Garter} (or other military
orders), an officer who seals the commissions and mandates
of the chapter and assembly of the knights, keeps the
register of their proceedings, and delivers their acts
under the seal of their order.

{Lord high chancellor of England}, the presiding judge in the
court of chancery, the highest judicial officer of the
crown, and the first lay person of the state after the
blood royal. He is created chancellor by the delivery into
his custody of the great seal, of which he becomes keeper.
He is privy counselor by his office, and prolocutor of the
House of Lords by prescription.

Chancellor \Chan"cel*lor\, n. [OE. canceler, chaunceler, F.
chancelier, LL. cancellarius chancellor, a director of
chancery, fr. L. cancelli lattices, crossbars, which
surrounded the seat of judgment. See {Chancel}.]
A judicial court of chancery, which in England and in the
United States is distinctively a court with equity
jurisdiction.

Note: The chancellor was originally a chief scribe or
secretary under the Roman emperors, but afterward was
invested with judicial powers, and had superintendence
over the other officers of the empire. From the Roman
empire this office passed to the church, and every
bishop has his chancellor, the principal judge of his
consistory. In later times, in most countries of
Europe, the chancellor was a high officer of state,
keeper of the great seal of the kingdom, and having the
supervision of all charters, and like public
instruments of the crown, which were authenticated in
the most solemn manner. In France a secretary is in
some cases called a chancellor. In Scotland, the
appellation is given to the foreman of a jury, or
assize. In the present German empire, the chancellor is
the president of the federal council and the head of
the imperial administration. In the United States, the
title is given to certain judges of courts of chancery
or equity, established by the statutes of separate
States. --Blackstone. Wharton.

{Chancellor} {of a bishop, or of a diocese} (R. C. Ch. & ch.
of Eng.), a law officer appointed to hold the bishop's
court in his diocese, and to assist him in matter of
ecclesiastical law.

{Chancellor of a cathedral}, one of the four chief
dignitaries of the cathedrals of the old foundation, and
an officer whose duties are chiefly educational, with
special reference to the cultivation of theology.

{Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster}, an officer before
whom, or his deputy, the court of the duchy chamber of
Lancaster is held. This is a special jurisdiction.

{Chancellor of a university}, the chief officer of a
collegiate body. In Oxford, he is elected for life; in
Cambridge, for a term of years; and his office is
honorary, the chief duties of it devolving on the vice
chancellor.

{Chancellor of the exchequer}, a member of the British
cabinet upon whom devolves the charge of the public income
and expenditure as the highest finance minister of the
government.

{Chancellor of the order of the Garter} (or other military
orders), an officer who seals the commissions and mandates
of the chapter and assembly of the knights, keeps the
register of their proceedings, and delivers their acts
under the seal of their order.

{Lord high chancellor of England}, the presiding judge in the
court of chancery, the highest judicial officer of the
crown, and the first lay person of the state after the
blood royal. He is created chancellor by the delivery into
his custody of the great seal, of which he becomes keeper.
He is privy counselor by his office, and prolocutor of the
House of Lords by prescription.

chancellor at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

chancellor
n 1: the person who is head of state (in several countries) [syn:
{premier}, {prime minister}]
2: the honorary or titular head of a university

chancellor at English (WD) Of Explained:

Inter: wikipedia » dab=chancellor (disambiguation)|chancellor

English

Inter: Webster 191 » 3
Inter: rf » c

Alternative forms

Inter: rel-top » Alternative forms
  • chanceler Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • chanceller Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • chaunceler Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • chaunceller Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • chancelor Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • chancelour Inter: qualifier » obsolete


Inter: rel-mi » d
  • chancellour Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • chauncelor Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • chauncellor Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • chauncelour Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • chauncellour Inter: qualifier » obsolete

  • Inter: rel-botto » m

    Etymology

    Inter: etyl » enm Inter: term » chaunceler|lang=enm, from Inter: etyl » fro Inter: term » chancelier|lang=fro, from Inter: etyl » LL. Inter: term » cancellarius|lang=la, a director of chancery, from Inter: etyl » la Inter: term » |cancelli lattices|crossbars, which surrounded the seat of judgment. See Inter: term » chancel|lang=en.

    Pronunciation

    * Inter: a » RP Inter: IPA » /ˈtʃɑːnsələ/, Inter: X-SAMPA » /"tSA:ns@l@/
    • Inter: a » GenAm Inter: IPA » /ˈtʃænsəlɚ/, Inter: X-SAMPA » /tS{ns@l@`/

      Noun

      Inter: wikipedi » a


    Inter: en-nou » n
  • A judicial court of chancery, which in England and in the United States is distinctively a court with equity jurisdiction.
    1. Head of a chancery.
    2. An important notary; a person in charge of some area of government, often justice or finance.
    3. The head of a university, sometimes purely ceremonial.
    4. The head of parliamentary government in some German speaking countries.
    5. A record keeper for a diocese or equivalent religious area.
    6. Inter: Scotlan » d Foreman of a jury.
    7. Inter: U » K Chancellor of the Exchequer.

      Usage notes

      The chancellor was originally a chief scribe or secretary under the Roman emperors, but afterward was invested with judicial powers, and had superintendence over the other officers of the empire. From the Roman empire this office passed to the church, and every bishop has his chancellor, the principal judge of his consistory. In later times, in most countries of Europe, the chancellor was a high officer of state, keeper of the great seal of the kingdom, and having the supervision of all charters, and like public instruments of the crown, which were authenticated in the most solemn manner. In France a secretary is in some cases called a chancellor. In Scotland, the appellation is given to the foreman of a jury, or assize. In Germany since the unification under Bismarck the office of Chancellor (styled "Reich Chancellor" under the Weimar Constitution and the Nazi dictatorship) is the President of the Federal Council and the head of the German Federal Government. In the United States, the title is given to certain judges of courts of chancery or equity, established by the statutes of separate States. Blackstone. Wharton.

      Derived terms

      * Chancellor of a bishop

  • Chancellor of a cathedral
  • Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
  • Chancellor of a university, the chief officer of a collegiate body.
  • Chancellor of the exchequer
  • Chancellor of the order of the Garter Inter: qualifier » or other military orders, an officer who seals the commissions and mandates of the chapter and assembly of the knights
  • Lord high chancellor of England

    Synonyms

    * Inter: sense » head of a university provost, rector, president, principal, master, mistress
  • Inter: sense » head of parliamentary government in German speaking countries Bundeskanzler, Bundeskanzlerin Inter: qualifier » female, Kanzler, Kanzlerin Inter: qualifier » female, premier, prime minister, PM, Reichskanzler Inter: qualifier » historical

    Translations

    Inter: trans-top » chancellor
  • Arabic: Inter: t- » ar|مستشار|m|alt=مُسْتَشار|tr=mustashaar
  • Armenian: Inter: t- » hy|կանցլեր|tr=kancʿler|sc=Armn
  • Bulgarian: Inter: t- » bg|канцлер|m|tr=káncler|sc=Cyrl
  • Czech: Inter: t- » cs|kancléř|m
  • Danish: Inter: t- » da|kansler
  • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|kanselier
  • Esperanto: Inter: t- » eo|kanceliero
  • Finnish: Inter: t+ » fi|kansleri
  • French: Inter: t+ » fr|chancelier|m, Inter: t+ » fr|chancelière|f
  • German: Inter: t+ » de|Kanzler|m
  • Greek: Inter: t+ » el|καγκελάριος|sc=Grek|tr=kankelários, Inter: t+ » el|πρωτοσύγκελλος|tr=protosúnkellos|sc=Grek Inter: qualifier » of the church
  • Icelandic: Inter: t- » is|Kanslari

  • Inter: trans-mi » d
    • Irish: Inter: t- » ga|seansailéir|m
    • Italian: Inter: t+ » it|cancelliere
    • Khmer: Inter: t- » km|អធិកាបតី|sc=Khmr|tr=a’tʰi’ka baa təy
    • Latin: Inter: t- » la|cancellarius
    • Norwegian: Inter: t- » no|kansler
    • Old English: Inter: t- » ang|canceler
    • Portuguese: Inter: t+ » pt|chanceler
    • Romanian: Inter: t- » ro|cancelar|m, Inter: t- » ro|cancelară|f
    • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|канцлер|m|tr=káncler|sc=Cyrl
    • Spanish: Inter: t- » es|canciller
    • Swedish: Inter: t- » sv|kansler


    Inter: trans-botto » m
    Translation: et » chancellor
    Translation: el » chancellor
    Translation: eo » chancellor
    Translation: fr » chancellor
    Translation: ko » chancellor
    Translation: io » chancellor
    Translation: it » chancellor
    Translation: hu » chancellor
    Translation: ml » chancellor
    Translation: my » chancellor
    Translation: pl » chancellor
    Translation: fi » chancellor
    Translation: ta » chancellor
    Translation: te » chancellor
    Translation: tr » chancellor
    Translation: vi » chancellor
    Translation: zh » chancellor