Online Dictionary

chancery Explained

chancery at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

['tʃænsərı]

chancery at English => English (English Etymology) Of Explained:

1377, "court of the Lord Chancellor of England," from O.Fr. chauncelerie, from M.L. cancellaria (see chancellor). In Eng., the highest court of judicature next to the House of Lords until the act of 1873. ///

chancery at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

n [singular] [Date: 1300-1400; Origin: chancellery]//
1 especially BrE a government office that collects and stores official papers:
2 the part of the British system of law courts which deals with equity:
3 the offices of an official representative of a foreign country: chancellery//

chancery at English => English (The Britannica Concise) Of Explained:

Court of public record and archive of state documents. The chancery system of the Roman Empire served as the model for the royal chanceries of medieval France and Germany. Medieval royal chanceries were headed by archchancellors and chancellors, who oversaw the work of scribes and notaries and sometimes served as advisers to the monarch.

chancery at English => English (Moby Thesaurus II) Of Explained:

66 Moby Thesaurus words for "chancery":
appellate court, archives, assizes, booking office, box office,
branch, branch office, cabinet, chambers, chancellery,
chancery court, circuit court, civil court, closet,
common-law court, conciliation court, consulate,
corporate headquarters, county court, court of appeals,
court of assize, court of chancery, court of claims,
court of conscience, court of equity, court of errors,
court of honor, court of inquiry, court of probate,
court of record, court of requests, court of review,
court of sessions, court of wards, criminal court, den,
district court, divorce court, embassy, equity court,
executive office, family court, files, headquarters, home office,
hustings, hustings court, juvenile court, kangaroo court, legation,
main office, mock court, moot court, night court, office,
police court, prize court, probate court, register office,
registry, sessions, shop, study, superior court, ticket office,
traffic court

chancery at English => English (Oxford Advanced Learners) Of Explained:

noun [sing.]
1 (Chancery) (law) a division of the High Court in Britain
2 (especially BrE) an office where public records are kept
3 (also chancery court) a court of law in the US that decides legal cases based on the principle of EQUITY
4 the offices where the official representative of a country works, in another country

CHANCERY at English => English (Bouviers Law) Of Explained:

protection.
see also GAME BIRD, SEABIRD, SONGBIRD, WATERBIRD

2 (BrE, slang, sometimes offensive) a way of referring to a young woman

3 (informal) a person of a particular type, especially sb who is strange or unusual in some way:
a wise old bird * She is that rare bird: a politician with a social conscience.

IDIOMS
be (strictly) for the birds (informal) to not be important or practical
the bird has flown the wanted person has escaped
a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush (saying) it is better to keep sth that you already have than to risk losing it by trying to get much more
the birds and the bees (humorous) the basic facts about sex, especially as told to children
a bird's-eye view (of sth) a view of sth from a high position looking down:
From the plane we had a bird's eye view of Manhattan.
birds of a feather (flock together) (saying) people of the same sort (are found together)
give sb / get the bird (informal)
1 (BrE) to shout at sb as a sign of disapproval; to be shouted at
2 (AmE) to make a rude sign at sb with your middle finger; to have this sign made at you
more at EARLY adj., KILL v., LITTLE adj.noun
a bowl filled with water for birds to wash in and drink from, usually in a garden/yardnoun
(plural birds of paradise) a bird with very bright feathers, found mainly in New Guineanoun (plural birds of passage)
1 a bird that travels regularly from one part of the world to another at different seasons of the year
2 a person who passes through a place without staying there longnoun
(plural birds of prey) a bird that hunts and kills other creatures for food. EAGLES, HAWKS and OWLS are all birds of prey.noun
(BrE) a wooden platform in a garden on which people put food for birdsnoun
(especially AmE) a stupid personnoun
a cage in which birds are kept, usually one in a housenoun
1 (spoken) a child's word for a little bird
2 (in golf) a score of one stroke less than PAR (= the standard score for a hole)
compare BOGEY, EAGLE
3 (AmE) = SHUTTLECOCKnoun
[U] special seeds for feeding birds that are in cagesnoun
[U] the musical sounds made by birds:
The woods were full of sunlight and birdsong.noun
a person who watches birds in their natural environment and identifies different breeds
birdwatching noun [U]noun
(plural Biros) (BrE) a plastic pen with a metal ball at the top that rolls ink onto the paper
compare BALLPOINTnoun
1 [U, C] the time when a baby is born; the process of being born:
The baby weighed three kilos at birth. * John was present at the birth of both his children. * It was a difficult birth. * a hospital / home birth * Mark has been blind from birth. * Please state your date of birth.
2 [sing.] the beginning of a new situation, idea, place, etc:
the birth of a new society in South Africa
3 [U] a person's origin or the social position of their family:
Anne was French by birth but lived most of her life in Italy. * a woman of noble birth
IDIOMS
give birth (to sb/sth) to produce a baby or young animal:
She died shortly after giving birth. * Mary gave birth to a healthy baby girl. * (figurative) It was the study of history that gave birth to the social sciences.noun
an official document that shows when and where a person was bornnoun
[U] the practice of controlling the number of children a person has, using various methods of CONTRACEPTION:
a reliable method of birth controlnoun
the woman who gave birth to a child who has been ADOPTEDnoun
the number of births every year for every 1 000 people in the population of a place:
a low / high birth rate * The birth rate is falling / rising.noun
the day in each year which is the same date as the one on which you were born:
Happy Birthday! * Oliver's 13th birthday * a birthday card / party / present
IDIOMS
in your birthday suit (humorous) not wearing any clothesnoun
[U] the action or process of giving birth:
a birthing poolnoun
a red or brown mark on a person's skin that has been there since they were bornnoun
1 the house or area where a person was born, especially a famous person
2 the place where sth first happened:
Hawaii was the birthplace of surfing.noun
a thing that sb has a right to because of the family or country they were born in, or because it is a basic right of all human beings:
The property is the birthright of the eldest child. * Education is every child's birthright.noun

1 [C] (BrE) a small flat dry cake for one person, usually sweet, and baked until crisp:
a packet of chocolate biscuits * a selection of cheese biscuits * The cake has a biscuit base (= one made from crushed biscuits).
compare COOKIE
see also DIGESTIVE BISCUIT, DOG BISCUIT

2 [C] (AmE) a soft bread roll, often eaten with GRAVY

3 [U] a pale yellowish-brown colour

IDIOMS
take the biscuit (BrE) (also take the cake AmE, BrE) (informal) to be the most surprising, annoying, etc. thing that has happened or that sb has done:
You've done some stupid things before, but this really takes the biscuit!verb
[VN] (technical) to divide sth into two equal partsadjective, noun
adjective
1 sexually attracted to both men and women
2 (biology) having both male and female sexual organs
bisexuality noun [U]
noun a person who is bisexual
compare HETEROSEXUAL, HOMOSEXUALnoun

1 a senior priest in charge of the work of the Church in a city or district:
the Bishop of Oxford * Bishop Harries
see also ARCHBISHOP

2 a piece used in the game of CHESS that is shaped like a bishop's hat and can move any number of squares in a DIAGONAL linenoun
1 the position of a bishop
2 the district for which a bishop is responsible
SYN DIOCESEnoun
(plural bison) a large hairy wild animal of the cow family. There are two types of bison, the N American (also called BUFFALO) and the European:
a herd of bisonnoun
[U, C] a thick soup, especially one made from shellfish:
lobster bisquenoun
(plural bistros) a small informal restaurantnoun

small amount

1 (a bit) [sing.] (used as an adverb) (especially BrE) rather; a little:
These trousers are a bit tight. * 'Are you tired?' 'Yes, I am a bit.' * It costs a bit more than I wanted to spend. * I can lend you fifty pounds, if you want. That should help a bit.

2 (a bit) [sing.] (especially BrE) a short time or distance:
Wait a bit! * Can you move up a bit? * Greg thought for a bit before answering.

3 [C] ~ of sth (especially BrE) a small amount or piece of sth:
some useful bits of information * With a bit of luck, we'll be there by 12. * I've got a bit of shopping to do. * a bit of cake * bits of grass / paper
part of sth
4 [C] (especially BrE) a part of sth larger:
The best bit of the holiday was seeing the Grand Canyon. * The school play was a huge success-the audience roared with laughter at all the funny bits.
large amount
5 [sing.] a ~ (of sth) (informal, especially BrE) a large amount:
'How much does he earn?' 'Quite a bit!' * The new system will take a bit of getting used to (= it will take a long time to get used to).
computing
6 [C] the smallest unit of information used by a computer
for horse
7 [C] a metal bar that is put in a horse's mouth so that the rider can control it
tool
8 [C] a tool or part of a tool for DRILLING (= making) holes
see also DRILL
money
9 (AmE, informal) an amount of money equal to 12ス cents
see also BITE, BIT, BITTEN v.
IDIOMS
the (whole) ...bit (informal, disapproving) behaviour or ideas that are typical of a particular group, type of person or activity:
She couldn't accept the whole drug-culture bit.
bit by bit a piece at a time; gradually:
He assembled the model aircraft bit by bit. * Bit by bit memories of the night came back to me.
a bit much (informal) not fair or not reasonable:
It's a bit much calling me at three in the morning. * The noise from next door is getting a bit much.
a bit of a ... (informal, especially BrE) used when talking about unpleasant or negative things or ideas, to mean 'rather a ...':
We may have a bit of a problem on our hands. * The rail strike is a bit of a pain.
a bit of all right (BrE, slang) a person that you think is sexually attractive:
Dave's new girlfriend is a bit of all right, isn't she?
a bit of rough (BrE, slang) a person of a low social class who has a sexual relationship with sb of a higher class
a bit on the side (BrE, slang) the boyfriend or girlfriend of sb who is already married or in a steady sexual relationship with sb else:
Is he your bit on the side?
bits and pieces / bobs (BrE, informal) small objects or items of various kinds:
She stuffed all her bits and pieces into a bag and left.
do your bit (informal) to do your share of a task:
We can finish this job on time if everyone does their bit.
every bit as good, bad, etc. (as sb/sth) just as good, bad, etc.; equally good, bad, etc:
Rome is every bit as beautiful as Paris. * He's every bit as clever as she is.
get the bit between your teeth (informal) to become very enthusiastic about sth that you have started to do so that you are unlikely to stop until you have finished
not a bit | not one (little) bit not at all; not in a

Chancery at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Chancery \Chan"cer*y\, n. [F. chancellerie, LL. cancellaria,
from L. cancellarius. See {Chancellor}, and cf.
{Chancellery}.]
1. In England, formerly, the highest court of judicature next
to the Parliament, exercising jurisdiction at law, but
chiefly in equity; but under the jurisdiction act of 1873
it became the chancery division of the High Court of
Justice, and now exercises jurisdiction only in equity.

2. In the Unites States, a court of equity; equity;
proceeding in equity.

Note: A court of chancery, so far as it is a court of equity,
in the English and American sense, may be generally, if
not precisely, described as one having jurisdiction in
cases of rights, recognized and protected by the
municipal jurisprudence, where a plain, adequate, and
complete remedy can not be had in the courts of common
law. In some of the American States, jurisdiction at
law and in equity centers in the same tribunal. The
courts of the United States also have jurisdiction both
at law and in equity, and in all such cases they
exercise their jurisdiction, as courts of law, or as
courts of equity, as the subject of adjudication may
require. In others of the American States, the courts
that administer equity are distinct tribunals, having
their appropriate judicial officers, and it is to the
latter that the appellation courts of chancery is
usually applied; but, in American law, the terms equity
and court of equity are more frequently employed than
the corresponding terms chancery and court of chancery.
--Burrill.

{Inns of chancery}. See under {Inn}.

{To get (or to hold) In chancery} (Boxing), to get the head
of an antagonist under one's arm, so that one can pommel
it with the other fist at will; hence, to have wholly in
One's power. The allusion is to the condition of a person
involved in the chancery court, where he was helpless,
while the lawyers lived upon his estate.

chancery at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

chancery
n 1: a court with jurisdiction in equity [syn: {court of chancery}]
2: an office of archives for public or ecclesiastic records; a
court of public records

chancery at English (WD) Of Explained:

==English==
Inter: Webster 191 » 3

Etymology

Inter: etyl » fr Inter: term » chancellerie|lang=fr, from Inter: etyl » LL. Inter: term » cancellaria|lang=la, from Inter: etyl » la Inter: term » cancellarius|lang=la, from Inter: term » cancellus||lattice|lang=la (English Inter: term » chancel|lang=en), from Inter: term » cancelli||grating, bars|lang=la (from which Inter: term » cancel||cross out (with lines, as in a latticework)|lang=en), from the lattice-work that separated a section of a church or court.Inter: R:Online Etymology Dictionar » yInter: R:Online Etymology Dictionary » chancel
See related Inter: term » chancellor|lang=en and Inter: term » chancellery|lang=en, and the more distantly related Inter: term » incarcerate||put behind bars|lang=en, from Inter: term » carcer||prison|lang=la.

Noun

Inter: en-noun » chanceries
  • In England, formerly, the highest court of judicature next to the Parliament, exercising jurisdiction at law, but chiefly in equity; but under the jurisdiction act of 1873 it became the chancery division of the High Court of Justice, and now exercises jurisdiction only in equity.
    1. In the United States, a court of equity; equity; proceeding in equity.
    2. The type of building that houses a diplomatic mission or embassy.
    3. The type of building that houses the offices and administration of a diocese; the offices of a diocese.

      Usage notes

      A court of chancery, so far as it is a court of equity, in the English and American sense, may be generally, if not precisely, described as one having jurisdiction in cases of rights, recognized and protected by the municipal jurisprudence, where a plain, adequate, and complete remedy can not be had in the courts of common law. In some of the American States, jurisdiction at law and in equity centers in the same tribunal. The courts of the United States also have jurisdiction both at law and in equity, and in all such cases they exercise their jurisdiction, as courts of law, or as courts of equity, as the subject of adjudication may require. In others of the American States, the courts that administer equity are distinct tribunals, having their appropriate judicial officers, and it is to the latter that the appellation courts of chancery is usually applied; but, in American law, the terms equity and court of equity are more frequently employed than the corresponding terms chancery and court of chancery.

      See also

      * Inns of chancery

  • to get in chancery or to hold in chancery (boxing), to get the head of an antagonist under ones arm, so that one can pommel it with the other fist at will; hence, to have wholly in One's power. The allusion is to the condition of a person involved in the chancery court, where he was helpless, while the lawyers lived upon his estate. ''

  • Inter: wikipedia » chancery

    References


    Translation: et » chancery
    Translation: io » chancery
    Translation: hu » chancery
    Translation: my » chancery
    Translation: pl » chancery
    Translation: fi » chancery
    Translation: ta » chancery
    Translation: te » chancery
    Translation: vi » chancery
    Translation: zh » chancery