Online Dictionary

come Explained

come at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

[kʌm]

come at English => English (English Etymology) Of Explained:

O.E. cuman "come" (class IV strong verb; past tense cuom, com, pp. cumen), from P.Gmc. *kwem-, from PIE base *gwem- "to go, come" (cf. Skt. gamati "he goes," Avestan jamaiti "goes," Tocharian kakmu "come," Lith. gemu "to be born"). Substitution of -o- for -u- is scribal change before minims, cf. monk, some, worm, orig. munuc, sum, wyrm. Past tense form is probably from O.N. kvam, replacing O.E. cuom. Amazingly productive with prepositions (NTC's "Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs" lists 198 combinations); consider the varied senses in come to "regain consciousness," come over "possess" (as an emotion), come at "attack," and come off "occur." For slang sexual senses, see cum. Come-back "verbal retort" is from 1889. ///

come at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

v past tense came /ke[hA366]m/past participle come [I] // ----------//
1 move towards somebody/something:
2 go with somebody:
3 travel to a place:
4 post:
5 happen:
6 reach a level/place:
7 be produced/sold:
8 order:
9 come open/undone/loose etc:
10 come to do something:
11 come and go:
12 take something as it comes:
13 have something coming (to you):
14 as nice/as stupid etc as they come:
15 for years/weeks/days etc to come:
16 in years/days to come:
17 have come a long way:
18 come as a surprise/relief/blow etc (to somebody):
19 come easily/naturally (to somebody):
20 come of age:
21 come right out with something/come right out and say something:
22 come clean:
23 not know whether you are coming or going:
24 come good/right:
25 come to pass:
26 sex:
27 come in!:
28 how come?:
29 come to think of it/come to that:
30 come July/next year/the next day etc:
31 come again?:
32 don't come the innocent/victim/helpless male etc with me:
33 come (now):
34 come, come!/come now: Phrasal verbs// come about// come across// come across with something// come after somebody// come along// come apart// come around// come at somebody/something// come away// come back// come before somebody/something// come between somebody// come by// come down// come down on somebody// come down to somebody/something// come down with something// come for somebody/something// come forward// come from somebody/something// come in// come in for something// come into something// come of something// come off// come on// come on to somebody/something// come out// come out at something// come out in something// come out of something// come out with something// come over// come round// come through// come through with something// come to// come under something// come up// come up against something/somebody// come up for something// come upon somebody/something// come up to something/somebody// come up with something// ----------// [Language: Old English; Origin: cuman]//
1 MOVE TOWARDS SOMEBODY/SOMETHING: to move towards you or arrive at the place where you are// → go// --Let me know when they come.// --Can you come here for a minute?// -- Come a bit closer and you'll be able to see better.// --What time will you be coming home ?// come in/into/out of etc// --There was a knock on the door and a young woman came into the room.// come to/towards// --I could see a figure coming towards me.// come across/down/up etc// --As they came down the track, the car skidded.// come to do sth// --I've come to see Philip.// come and do sth// --I'll come and help you move the rest of the boxes.// --Come and look at this!// come running/flying/speeding etc // --Jess came flying round the corner and banged straight into me.// come to dinner/lunch // --What day are your folks coming to dinner?// here comes sb/sth spoken (=used to say that someone or something is coming towards you) // --Ah, here comes the bus at last!//
2 GO WITH SOMEBODY: if someone comes with you, they go to a place with you// --We're going for a drink this evening. Would you like to come?// come with// --I asked Rosie if she'd like to come with us.// come along// --It should be good fun. Why don't you come along?//
3 TRAVEL TO A PLACE: to travel to or reach a place// --Which way did you come?// come through/across/by way of etc// --They came over the mountains in the north.// come from// --Legend has it that the tribe came from across the Pacific Ocean.// come by car/train/bus etc // --Will you be coming by train?// --Have you come far (=travelled a long way) today?// --I've come a long way to see you.// come 50/100 etc miles/kilometres // --Some of the birds have come thousands of miles to winter here.//
4 POST: if a letter etc comes, it is delivered to you by post// arrive// --A letter came for you this morning.// --The phone bill hasn't come yet.//
5 HAPPEN: if a time or an event comes, it arrives or happens// --At last the day came for us to set off.// --The moment had come for me to break the news to her.// --The time will come when you'll thank me for this.// --Christmas seems to come earlier every year.// be/have yet to come (=used when something has not happened yet but will happen) // --The most exciting part is yet to come.// --I knew he'd be able to take care of himself, come what may (=whatever happens) .//
6 REACH A LEVEL/PLACE: [always + adverb/preposition] to reach a particular level or place// come up/down// --She had blonde hair which came down to her waist.// --The water came up as far as my chest.//
7 BE PRODUCED/SOLD: [always + adverb/preposition] to be produced or sold with particular features// come in// --This particular sofa comes in four different colours.// --Cats come in many shapes and sizes.// come with// --The computer comes complete with software and games.//
8 ORDER: [always + adverb/preposition] to be in a particular position in an order, a series, or a list// come before/after// --P comes before Q in the alphabet.// come first/second etc // --She came first in the 200 metres.//
9 come open/undone/loose etc: to become open etc// --His shoelace had come undone.// --The rope came loose.//
10 come to do sth: a) to begin to have a feeling or opinion// --He came to think of Italy as his home.// --I came to believe that he was innocent after all.// b) to do something by chance, without planning or intending to do it// --Can you tell me how the body came to be discovered?// come to be doing sth// --I often wondered how I came to be living in such a place.//
11 come and go: a) to be allowed to go into and leave a place whenever you want// --The students can come and go as they please.// b) to keep starting and stopping// --The pain comes and goes.//
12 take sth as it comes: to accept something as it happens, without trying to plan for it or change it// --We just take each year as it comes.// --He takes life as it comes.//
13 have sth coming (to you): informal to deserve to be punished or to have something bad happen to you// --I do feel sorry for him, but I'm afraid he had it coming.//
14 as nice/as stupid etc as they come: informal extremely nice, stupid etc// --My uncle Walter is as obstinate as they come.//
15 for years/weeks/days etc to come: used to emphasize that something will continue for a long time into the future// --This is a moment that will be remembered and celebrated for years to come.//
16 in years/days to come: in the future// --In years to come, some of the practices we take for granted now will seem quite barbaric.//
17 have come a long way: to have made a lot of progress// --Computer technology has come a long way since the 1970s.//
18 come as a surprise/relief/blow etc (to sb): to make someone feel surprised, pleased, disappointed etc// --The decision came as a great relief to us all.// --The news will come as no surprise to his colleagues.//
19 come easily/naturally (to sb): to be easy for someone to do// --Public speaking does not come easily to most people.// --Writing came naturally to her, even as a child.//
20 come of age: a) to reach the age when you are legally considered to be an adult// --He'll inherit the money when he comes of age.// b) to develop into an advanced or successful form// --Space technology didn't really come of age until the 1950s.//
21 come right out with sth/come right out and say sth: informal to say something in a very direct way, often when other people think this is surprising// --You came right out and told him? I don't know how you dared!//
22 come clean: informal to tell the truth about something you have done// come clean about// --I think you should come clean about where you were last night.//
23 not know whether you are coming or going: informal to feel very confused because a lot of different things are happening// --I don't know whether I'm coming or going this week.//
24 come good/right: BrE informal to end well, after there have been a lot of problems// --Don't worry, it'll all come right in the end.//
25 come to pass: literary to happen after a period of time// --It came to pass that they had a son.//
26 SEX: informal to have an orgasm//
27 spoken come in!: used to tell someone who has knocked on your door to enter your room, house etc// --She tapped timidly on the door. 'Come in!' boomed a deep voice from inside.//
28 spoken how come?: used to ask someone why or how something happened// --How come you've ended up here?// --'Last I heard, she was teaching in Mexico.' 'How come?'//
29 spoken come to think of it/come to that: used to add something that you have just realized or remembered// --Come to think of it, George did seem a bit depressed yesterday.// --He had never expected to have a wife, or even a girlfriend come to that.//
30 spoken come July/next year/the next day etc: used to talk about at a particular time in the future// --Come spring, you'll have plenty of colour in the garden.//
31 spoken come again?: used to ask someone to repeat what they have just said//
32 spoken don't come the innocent/victim/helpless male etc with me: BrE used to tell someone not to pretend that they are something they are not in order to get sympathy or help from you// --Don't come the poor struggling artist with me. You're just lazy!//
33 spoken come (now): old-fashioned used to comfort or gently encourage someone//
34 spoken come, come!/come now: old-fashioned used to tell someone that you do not accept what they are saying or doing// come about phr v//
1 to happen, especially in a way that is not planned: --The opportunity to get into computing came about quite by accident.// --I don't know how this confusion has come about.//
2 if a ship comes about, it changes direction: come across phr v//
1 come across sb/sth: to meet, find, or discover someone or something by chance// --I came across an old diary in her desk.// --I've never come across anyone quite like her before.//
2 if an idea comes across well, it is easy for people to understand: --Your point really came across at the meeting.//
3 if someone comes across in a particular way, they seem to have particular qualities: come over// come across as// --He comes across as a very intelligent, sensitive man.// --She sometimes comes across as being rather arrogant.// --I don't think I came across very well (=seemed to have good qualities) in the interview.// come across with [come across with sth] phr v// to provide money or information when it is needed// --I hoped he might come across with a few facts.// come after [come after sb] phr v// to look for someone in order to hurt them, punish them, or get something from them// --She was terrified that Trevor would come after her.// come along phr v//
1 be coming along: informal to be developing or making progress// progress// --He opened the oven door to see how the food was coming along.// --Your English is coming along really well.//
2 to appear or arrive: --A bus should come along any minute now.// --Take any job opportunity that comes along.//
3 : a) to go to a place with someone// --We're going into town - do you want to come along?// b) to go somewhere after someone// --You go on ahead - I'll come along later.//
4 come along!: a) used to tell someone to hurry up// come on// --Come along! We're all waiting for you!// b) used to encourage someone to try harder// come on// --Come along! Don't give up yet!// come apart phr v//
1 to split or fall into pieces: --I picked the magazine up and it came apart in my hands.//
2 to begin to fail: --The whole basis of the agreement was coming apart.// --She felt as if her life was coming apart at the seams (=failing completely) .// come around phr v//
1 also come round BrE to come to someone's home or the place where they work in order to visit them: come over// --I'll come around later and see how you are.// --Why don't you come round for lunch?//
2 also come round BrE : to change your opinion so that you now agree with someone or are no longer angry with them// come around to// --It took him a while to come around to the idea.// --Don't worry - she'll come round eventually.//
3 also come round BrE : if a regular event comes around, it happens as usual// --By the time the summer came around, Kelly was feeling much better.//
4 AmE to become conscious again after you have been unconscious: British Equivalent: come round// --When she came around her mother was sitting by her bed.// come around from// --You might feel a little sick when you come around from the anesthetic.// come at / [come at sb/sth] phr v//
1 to move towards someone in a threatening way: --Suddenly, he came at me with a knife.//
2 if images, questions, facts etc come at you, you feel confused because there are too many of them at the same time: --Questions were coming at me from all directions.//
3 informal to consider or deal with a problem in a particular way: approach// --We need to come at the problem from a different angle.// come away phr v//
1 to become separated from the main part of something: come off// --One of the wires in the plug had come away.// --I turned some of the pages and they came away in my hand.//
2 to leave a place with a particular feeling or idea: --We came away thinking that we had done quite well.// come away with// --I came away with the impression that the school was very well run.// come back phr v//
1 to return to a particular place or person: return// --My mother was scared that if I left home I'd never come back.// --Ginny's left me, and there's nothing I can do to persuade her to come back.//
2 to become fashionable or popular again: comeback// --Who'd have thought hippy gear would ever come back!// --High heels are coming back into fashion .//
3 to appear or start to affect someone or something again: return// --The pain in her shoulder was coming back again.// --It took a while for my confidence to come back.//
4 if something comes back to you, you remember it or remember how to do it: --As I walked the city streets that evening, the memories came flooding back.// come back to// --I can't think of her name at the moment, but it'll come back to me.//
5 to reply to someone quickly, often in an angry or unkind way: comeback// come back at// --He came back at me immediately, accusing me of being a liar.// come before / [come before sb/sth] phr v// to be brought to someone in authority, especially a judge in a law court, to be judged or discussed by them// --When you come before the judge, it's best to tell the whole truth.// --The case is due to come before the courts next month.// come between [come between sb] phr v//
1 to make people argue and feel angry with each other, when they had been friends before: --Nothing will ever come between us now.// --I didn't want to come between a husband and wife.//
2 to prevent someone from giving enough attention to something: --She never let anything come between her and her work.// come by phr v//
1 come by sth: to manage to get something that is rare or difficult to get// --How did you come by these pictures?// --Jobs were hard to come by .//
2 come by (sth): to make a short visit to a place on your way to somewhere else// --He said he'd come by later.// --I'll come by the house and get my stuff later, OK?// come down phr v//
1 : a) if a price, level etc comes down, it gets lower// --It looks as if interest rates will come down again this month.// b) to accept a lower price// come down to// --He's asking [hA124]5000, but he may be willing to come down to [hA124]4800.//
2 if someone comes down to a place, they travel south to the place where you are: --Why don't you come down for the weekend sometime?// come down to// --Are you coming down to Knoxville for Christmas?//
3 to fall to the ground: --A lot of trees came down in the storm.// --We were still out in the fields when the rain started coming down.//
4 come down on the side of sb/sth: also come down in favour of sb/sth // to decide to support someone or something// --The committee came down in favour of making the information public.//
5 informal to start to feel normal again after you have been feeling very happy and excited: --He was on a real high all last week and he's only just come down.//
6 informal to stop feeling the effects of a strong drug: --When I came down, I remembered with horror some of the things I'd said.//
7 BrE old-fashioned to leave a university after completing a period of study: come down on [come down on sb] phr v// to punish someone or criticize them severely// --We need to come down hard on young offenders.// --I made the mistake of answering back, and she came down on me like a ton of bricks (=very severely) .// come down to / [come down to sb/sth] phr v//
1 if a complicated situation or problem comes down to something, that is the single most important thing: -- It all comes down to money in the end.//
2 if something old has come down to you, it has been passed between people over a long period of time until you have it: --The text which has come down to us is only a fragment of the original.// come down with [come down with sth] phr v// to get an illness// --I think I'm coming down with a cold.// come for / [come for sb/sth] phr v//
1 to arrive to collect someone or something: --I'll come for you at about eight o'clock.//
2 to arrive at a place in order to take someone away by force: --Members of the secret police came for him in the middle of the night.// come forward phr v// to offer help to someone, or offer to do something// --So far, only one candidate has come forward.// --The police are appealing for more witnesses to come forward with information.// come from / [come from sb/sth] phr v//
1 if you come from a place, you were born there or lived there when you were young: --I come from London originally.//
2 to be obtained from a place, thing, or person, or to start or be made somewhere: --A lot of drugs come from quite common plants.// --My information comes from a very reputable source.// --The idea came from America.//
3 to happen as the result of doing something: come from doing sth// --Most of her problems come from expecting too much of people.//
4 coming from him/her/you etc: spoken used to say that someone should not criticize another person for doing something, because they have done the same thing themselves// --You think I'm too selfish? That's rich coming from you!//
5 where sb is coming from: informal the basic attitude or opinion someone has, which influences what they think, say, or do// --I can see where you're coming from now.// come in phr v//
1 if a train, bus, plane, or ship comes in, it arrives at a place: --What time does your train come in?// come in to// --We come in to Heathrow at nine in the morning.//
2 if money or information comes in, you receive it: --Reports are coming in of a massive earthquake in Mexico.// --We haven't got enough money coming in.//
3 to be involved in a plan, deal etc: --We need some financial advice - that's where Kate comes in.// come in on// --You had the chance to come in on the deal.//
4 to join in a conversation or discussion: --Can I come in here and add something to what you're saying?//
5 to become fashionable or popular: → go out// --Trainers really became popular in the 1980s, when casual sportswear came in.//
6 to finish a race: come in first/second etc // --His horse came in second to last.//
7 if the tide comes in, the sea moves towards the land and covers the edge of it: → go out// come in for [come in for sth] phr v// come in for criticism/blame/scrutiny// to be criticized, blamed etc for something// --The government has come in for fierce criticism over its handling of this affair.// come into [come into sth] phr v//
1 to receive money, land, or property from someone after they have died: --She'll come into quite a lot of money when her father dies.//
2 to be involved in something: --Josie doesn't come into the movie until quite near the end.// --Where do I come into all this?//
3 come into view/sight: if something comes into view, you begin to see it// --The mountains were just coming into view.//
4 come into leaf/flower/blossom: to start to produce leaves or flowers// --The early roses were just coming into flower.//
5 not come into it: spoken used to say that something is not important// --Money doesn't really come into it.//
6 come into your own: to become very good, useful, or important in a particular situation// --On icy roads, a four-wheel drive vehicle really comes into its own.// come of [come of sth] phr v// to happen as a result of something// --I did ask a few questions, but nothing came of it.// --That's what comes of not practising - you've forgotten everything!// come off phr v//
1 come off (sth): to become removed from something// --The label had come off, so there was no way of knowing what was on the disk.//
2 come off (sth): BrE to fall off something// --Dyson came off his bike as he rounded the last corner, but wasn't badly hurt.//
3 informal if something that has been planned comes off, it happens: --In the end the trip never came off.//
4 informal to be successful: --It was a good idea, but it didn't quite come off.// --The performance on the first night came off pretty well .//
5 come off sth: to stop taking a drug that you have been taking regularly// --It wasn't until I tried to come off the pills that I realized I was addicted.//
6 come off best/better/worst etc: BrE to gain or lose the most, more, the least etc from a situation// --As far as pensions go, it's still women who come off worst.//
7 come off it!: BrE spoken used to tell someone that you do not believe what they are saying// --Oh come off it! You can't seriously be saying you knew nothing about any of this.// come on phr v//
1 come on!: spoken // a) used to tell someone to hurry// --Come on, we'll be late!// b) used to encourage someone to do something// --Come on, you can do it!// --Come on, cheer up!// c) used to tell someone that you know that what they have just said was not true or right// --Oh come on, don't lie!// d) used to make someone angry enough to want to fight you// --Come on, then, hit me!//
2 come on in/over/up etc: spoken used to tell someone to come in, over, up etc, usually in a friendly way// --Come on in - I've made some coffee.//
3 if a light or machine comes on, it starts working: --A dog started barking and lights came on in the house.//
4 if an illness comes on, you start to be ill with it: --I can feel a headache coming on.//
5 if a television or radio programme comes on, it starts: --Just at that moment, the news came on.//
6 if rain or snow comes on, it starts: --The rain came on just before lunchtime.//
7 to come onto a stage or sports field: --He scored only two minutes after he'd come on.//
8 to improve or make progress: --The children are really coming on now.// --Your English is coming on really well.//
9 come on sb/sth: to find or discover someone or something by chance// --We came on a group of students having a picnic.//
10 come on strong: informal to make it very clear to someone that you think they are sexually attractive// come on to / [come on to sb/sth] phr v//
1 to start talking about a new subject: --I'll come on to this question in a few moments.//
2 informal if someone comes on to another person, they make it very clear that they are sexually interested in them: come-on// --The way she was coming on to Jack, I'm amazed he managed to get out alive!// come out phr v//
1 if something comes out, it is removed from a place: --These stains will never come out!//
2 if information comes out, people learn about it, especially after it has been kept secret: --No doubt the truth will come out one day.// -- It's come out that several ministers received payments from the company.//
3 if a photograph comes out, it shows a clear picture: --I took loads of photographs, but most of them didn't come out.// --Some of the wedding photos have come out really well.//
4 if a book, record etc comes out, it becomes publicly available: --When is the new edition coming out?//
5 if something comes out in a particular way, that is what it is like after it has been made or produced: --I've made a cake, but it hasn't come out very well.// --The cover has come out a bit too big.//
6 if something you say comes out in a particular way, that is how it sounds or how it is understood: --His words came out as little more than a whisper.// --That didn't come out the way I meant it to.// --I tried to explain everything to her, but it came out all wrong (=not in the way I intended) .//
7 if someone comes out in a particular way, that is the situation they are in at the end of an event or series of events: --The more experienced team came out on top.// come out of// --She came out of the divorce quite well.//
8 to be easy to notice: --His right-wing opinions come out quite strongly in his later writings.//
9 to say publicly that you strongly support or oppose a plan, belief etc: come out in favour of// --The board of directors has come out strongly in favour of a merger.// come out against// --Teachers have come out against the proposed changes.// --At least he's got the courage to come out and say what he thinks.//
10 if the sun, moon, or stars come out, they appear in the sky: --The sky cleared and the sun came out.//
11 if a flower comes out, it opens: --The snowdrops were just starting to come out.//
12 if someone comes out, they say that they are gay when this was a secret before: come out to// --That summer, I decided to come out to my parents.//
13 BrE informal to refuse to work, as a protest: --Nurses have threatened to come out in support of their pay claim.// --We decided to come out on strike .//
14 if a young woman came out in the past, she was formally introduced into upper class society at a large formal dance: come out at [come out at sth] phr v// if something comes out at a particular amount, that is the amount it adds up to// --The whole trip, including fares, comes out at $900.// come out in [come out in sth] phr v// come out in spots/a rash etc// if you come out in spots etc, spots appear on your body// --If I eat eggs, I come out in a rash.// come out of [come out of sth] phr v//
1 to no longer be in a bad situation: --There are signs that the country is coming out of recession.//
2 to happen as a result of something: --One or two excellent ideas came out of the meeting.//
3 come out of yourself: informal to start to behave in a more confident way// --Penny's really come out of herself since she started that course.// come out with [come out with sth] phr v// to say something, especially something unusual or unexpected// --Some of the things he comes out with are so funny!// come over phr v//
1 : a) if someone comes over, they visit you at your house// --Do you want to come over on Friday evening?// b) if someone comes over, they come to the country where you are// come over to/from// --When did your family first come over to America?//
2 come over sb: if a strong feeling comes over you, you suddenly experience it// --A wave of sleepiness came over me.// --I'm sorry about that - I don't know what came over me (=I do not know why I behaved in that way) .//
3 if an idea comes over well, people can understand it easily: --I thought that the points he was making came over quite clearly.//
4 if someone comes over in a particular way, they seem to have particular qualities: come across// --He didn't come over very well (=seem to have good qualities) in the interview.// come over as// --She comes over as a very efficient businesswoman.//
5 come over (all) shy/nervous etc: informal to suddenly become very shy, nervous etc// come round phr v// to come around// come through phr v//
1 if a piece of information, news etc comes through, it arrives somewhere: --We're still waiting for our exam results to come through.// --There is news just coming through of an explosion in a chemical factory.//
2 to be made official, especially by having the correct documents officially approved: --I'm still waiting for my divorce to come through.//
3 come through (sth): to continue to live, be strong, or succeed after a difficult or dangerous time// survive// --If he comes through the operation OK he should be back to normal within a few weeks.// --It's been a tough time, but I'm sure you'll come through and be all the wiser for it.// come through with [come through with sth] phr v// to give someone something they need, especially when they have been worried that you would not produce it in time// --Our representative in Hong Kong finally came through with the figures.// come to phr v//
1 come to a decision/conclusion/agreement etc: to decide something, agree on something etc after considering or discussing a situation// reach// --We came to the conclusion that there was no other way back to the camp.// --If they don't come to a decision by midnight, the talks will be abandoned.//
2 come to a halt/stop: a) to slow down and stop// stop// --The train came to a stop just yards from the barrier.// b) to stop operating or continuing// --After the election our funding came to an abrupt halt.//
3 come to sth: to develop so that a particular situation exists, usually a bad one// --I never thought it would come to this .// --We need to be prepared to fight, but hopefully it won't come to that (=that won't be necessary) .// --All those years of studying, and in the end it all came to nothing .// -- It's come to something when I'm not allowed to express an opinion in my own house!// what is the world/the country etc coming to? (=used to say that the world etc is in a bad situation) //
4 come to sth: to add up to a total amount// --That comes to [hA124]23.50.// --The bill came to [hA124]48.50.//
5 come to sb: if a thought or idea comes to you, you realize or remember something// --The answer came to me in a flash.// --I've forgotten her name, but maybe it'll come to me later.//
6 to become conscious again after you have been unconscious: --When he came to, he was lying on the floor with his hands tied behind his back.//
7 when it comes to sth: informal when you are dealing with something or talking about something// --He's a bit of an expert when it comes to computers.// come under [come under sth] phr v//
1 come under attack/fire/scrutiny etc: to be attacked, shot at etc// --The government has come under attack from opposition leaders over proposals to cut health spending.//
2 to be governed or controlled by a particular organization or person: --The organization comes under the authority of the EU.//
3 if a piece of information comes under a particular title, you can find it under that title: --The proposals come under three main headings.// come up phr v//
1 if someone comes up to you, they come close to you, especially in order to speak to you: --One of the teachers came up and started talking to me.// come up to// --A man came up to him and asked for a light.//
2 if someone comes up to a place, they travel north to the place where you are: come up to// --Why don't you come up to New York for the weekend?//
3 if a subject comes up, people mention it and discuss it: arise// --His name came up in the conversation.// --The subject of salaries didn't come up.//
4 if a problem or difficulty comes up, it appears or starts to affect you: arise// --I'm afraid I'll have to cancel our date - something's come up .// --The same problems come up every time.//
5 if a job or an opportunity comes up, it becomes available: --A vacancy has come up in the accounts department.//
6 to be dealt with in a law court: --Your case comes up next week.//
7 be coming up: to be going to happen soon// --With Christmas coming up, few people have much money to spare.//
8 if the sun or moon comes up, it moves up into the sky where you can see it: rise// --It was six o'clock, and the sun was just coming up.//
9 if a plant comes up, it begins to appear above the ground: --The first spring bulbs are just coming up.//
10 if food comes up, it goes back through your mouth from your stomach after being swallowed: vomit//
11 coming (right) up!: spoken used to say that food or drink will be ready very soon// --'Two martinis, please.' 'Coming up!'// come up against / [come up against sth/sb] phr v// to have to deal with problems or difficulties// --We may find we come up against quite a lot of opposition from local people.// --You've got no idea of what you're going to come up against.// come up for [come up for sth] phr v//
1 come up for discussion/examination/review etc: to be discussed, examined etc// --This matter will come up for discussion at next month's meeting.// --The regulations come up for review in April.//
2 come up for election/re-election/selection etc: to reach the time when people have to vote about whether you should continue in a political position// --The governors come up for re-election next year.// come upon / [come upon sb/sth] phr v//
1 to find or discover something or someone by chance: --We came upon a little cottage just on the edge of the wood.//
2 literary if a feeling comes upon you, you suddenly feel it: --A wave of tiredness came upon her.// come up to / [come up to sth/sb] phr v//
1 to reach a particular standard or to be as good as you expected: --This doesn't come up to the standard of your usual work.// --The resort certainly failed to come up to expectations .//
2 be (just) coming up to sth: to be nearly a particular time// --It's just coming up to 11 o'clock.// come up with [come up with sth] phr v//
1 to think of an idea, answer etc: --Is that the best excuse you can come up with?// --We've been asked to come up with some new ideas.//
2 informal to produce an amount of money: --We wanted to buy the house but we couldn't come up with the cash.// --How am I supposed to come up with $10,000?// ----------// WORD CHOICEcome, go // Use come for movement towards the place where the speaker is or will be : Come and see me at my office. | I could see them coming down the hill (=getting nearer to me)| .| When are you coming home (=to our home)| ? // Use go for movement in other directions : Are you going to Sally's tonight? | I wish he would go home (=to his home, away from me). // ----------//
come 2 n [U] informal [Date: 1900-2000; Origin: COME119]// a man's semen (=the liquid he produces during sex) //

come at Italian => English Of Explained:

nightrobbersturdyconfe

come at English => English (Moby Thesaurus II) Of Explained:

265 Moby Thesaurus words for "come":
accomplish, accost, achieve, achieve satisfaction, acquire, add up,
add up to, advance, affect, aggregate, amount to, anticipate,
appear, approach, appropinquate, approximate, arise, arrive,
arrive at, arrive in, assault, attack, attain, attain to, await,
awaken, bail out, be, be destined, be fated, be found, be imminent,
be involved, be met with, be realized, be received, be revealed,
be to be, be to come, bear down on, bear down upon, bear up,
bechance, become manifest, become visible, befall, betide, blame,
blow in, bob up, break, break cover, break forth, bump into,
burst forth, catch, chance, charge, check in, clean, climax,
clock in, close, close in, close with, come about, come across,
come along, come apart, come around, come at, come by, come clean,
come closer, come down, come down on, come down with, come forth,
come forward, come in, come in sight, come near, come off, come on,
come out, come over, come through, come to, come to hand,
come to light, come to pass, come true, come up, communicate,
concern, conclude, confront, contract, criticize, crop out,
crop up, crumble, debouch, descend on, descend upon, develop,
discover, disembogue, disintegrate, do, draw near, draw nigh,
draw on, earn, effuse, ejaculate, emanate, emerge, encounter, end,
enter, erupt, eventuate, expect, extrude, fade in, fall, fall out,
fall to pieces, fare, fetch, fetch up at, find, finish, fly at,
foresee, foretell, gain, gain upon, get, get about, get around,
get better, get hold of, get in, get off, get out, get there,
get to, get well, give up, go about, go for, go off, go over, grow,
hap, happen, happen along, happen by chance, hazard,
heave in sight, hit, hit town, hope, influence, involve, issue,
issue forth, jump out, lay hold of, leak out, lie ahead, look for,
look forth, look forward to, loom, make, make for, make it,
materialize, move, move along, narrow the gap, near, nigh,
not fail, number, obtain, occur, outcrop, pass, pass off, pay up,
peep out, penetrate, plan, plot, pop up, possess, pounce on,
pounce upon, predict, premiere, present itself, procure, progress,
project, prophesy, protrude, prove, proximate, pull in, punch in,
reach, reach orgasm, rear its head, rebuke, regard, relate to,
reprimand, revile, revive, ring in, rise, roll in, run across,
run into, run to, rush at, sally, sally forth, secure,
see the light, separate, settle, show, show up, sidle up to,
sign in, sink in, step up, stream forth, strike the eye,
stumble on, stumble upon, submit, succeed, succumb to, surface,
tack, take place, take possession of, terminate, threaten, thrive,
time in, total, transpire, turn out, turn up, visit, wake up, win,
yield

come at English => English (Oxford Advanced Learners) Of Explained:

verb, exclamation, noun
verb (came come)
to a place
1 to move to or towards a person or place: [V, usually +adv./prep.] He came into the room and shut the door. * She comes to work by bus. * My son is coming home soon. * Come here! * Come and see us soon! * Here comes Jo (= Jo is coming)! * He has come all the way from Tokyo. * There's a storm coming. * [V to inf] They're coming to stay for a week.
HELP NOTE In spoken English come can be used with and plus another verb, instead of with to and the infinitive, to show purpose or to tell sb what to do: When did she last come and see you? * Come and have your dinner. The and is sometimes left out, especially in AmE: Come have your dinner.
2 [V] ~ (to ...) to arrive at or reach a place:
They continued until they came to a river. * What time did you come (= to my house)? * Spring came late this year. * Your breakfast is coming soon. * Have any letters come for me? * Help came at last. * The CD comes complete with all the words of the songs. * The time has come (= now is the moment) to act.
3 ~ for / about sth | ~ to do sth to arrive somewhere in order to do sth or get sth:
[V] I've come for my book. * I've come about my book. * I've come to get my book. * [V -ing] He came looking for me.
4 ~ (to sth) (with sb) to move or travel, especially with sb else, to a particular place or in order to be present at an event:
[V] I've only come for an hour. * Are you coming to the club with us tonight? * Thanks for coming (= to my house, party, etc.). * [V -ing] Why don't you come skating tonight?
running / hurrying etc.
5 [V -ing, usually +adv./prep.] to move in a particular way or while doing sth else:
The children came running into the room.
travel
6 [VN] to travel a particular distance:
We've come 50 miles this morning. * (figurative) The company has come a long way (= made lot of progress) in the last 5 years.
happen
7 [V] to happen:
The agreement came after several hours of negotiations. * The rains came too late to do any good. * Her death came as a terrible shock to us. * His resignation came as no surprise. * The high point of the concert came during the drum solo.
8 [V to inf] used in questions to talk about how or why sth happened:
How did he come to break his leg? * How do you come to be so late?
see also HOW COME?
to a position / state
9 [V +adv./prep.] (not used in the progressive tenses) to have a particular position:
That comes a long way down my list of priorities. * His family comes first (= is the most important thing in his life). * She came second (= received the second highest score) in the exam.
10 [V] ~ to / into sth used in many expressions to show that sth has reached a particular state:
At last winter came to an end. * He came to power in 1959. * When will they come to a decision? * The trees are coming into leaf.
11 ~ (in sth) (not used in the progressive tenses) (of goods, products, etc.) to be available or to exist in a particular way:
[V] This dress comes in black, brown and red. * [V-ADJ] (informal) New cars don't come cheap (= they are expensive).
12 to become:
[V-ADJ] The buttons on her blouse had come undone. * The handle came loose. * Everything will come right in the end. * [V to inf] This design came to be known as the Oriental style.
13 [V to inf] to reach a point where you realize, understand or believe sth:
In time she came to love him. * She had come to see the problem in a new light. * I've come to expect this kind of behaviour from him.
time
14 (come) [VN] (old-fashioned, informal) when the time mentioned comes:
They would have been married forty years come this June. * Come next week she'll have changed her mind.
sex
15 [V] (slang) to have an ORGASM
IDIOMS
Most idioms containing come are at the entries for the nouns or adjectives in the idioms, for example come a cropper is at cropper.
be as clever, stupid, etc. as they come (informal) to be very clever, stupid, etc.
come again? (spoken, informal) used to ask sb to repeat sth:
'She's an entomologist.' 'Come again?' 'An entomologist-she studies insects.'
come and go
1 to arrive and leave; to move freely:
They had a party next door-we heard people coming and going all night.
2 to be present for a short time and then go away:
The pain in my leg comes and goes.
come easily, naturally, etc. to sb (of an activity, a skill, etc.) to be easy, natural, etc. for sb to do:
Acting comes naturally to her.
come over (all) faint, dizzy, giddy, etc. (old-fashioned, BrE, informal) to suddenly feel ill/sick or FAINT
come to nothing | not come to anything to be unsuccessful; to have no successful result:
How sad that all his hard work should come to nothing. * Her plans didn't come to anything.
come to that | if it comes to that (informal, especially BrE) used to introduce sth extra that is connected with what has just been said:
I don't really trust him-nor his wife, come to that.
come what may in spite of any problems or difficulties you may have:
He promised to support her come what may.
how come ( ...)? (spoken) used to say you do not understand how sth can happen and would like an explanation:
If she spent five years in Paris, how come her French is so bad?
not come to much to not be important or successful
to come (used after a noun) in the future:
They may well regret the decision in years to come. * This will be a problem for some time to come (= for a period of time in the future).
when it comes to sth / to doing sth when it is a question of sth:
When it comes to getting things done, he's useless.
where sb is coming from (informal, spoken) somebody's ideas, beliefs, personality, etc. that makes them say what they have said:
I see where you're coming from (= I understand what you mean).
PHRASAL VERBS
come about (that ...) to happen:
Can you tell me how the accident came about?
come across (also come over)
1 to be understood:
He spoke for a long time but his meaning didn't really come across.
2 to make a particular impression:
She comes across well in interviews. * He came over as a sympathetic person.
come across sb/sth [no passive] to meet or find sb/sth by chance:
I came across children sleeping under bridges. * She came across some old photographs in a drawer.
come across with sth [no passive] (BrE) to provide or supply sth when you need it:
I hoped she'd come across with some more information.
come after sb [no passive] to chase or follow sb
come along
1 to arrive; to appear:
When the right opportunity comes along, she'll take it.
2 to go somewhere with sb:
I'm glad you came along.
3 to improve or develop in the way that you want:
Your French has come along a lot recently.
4 used in orders to tell sb to hurry, or to try harder:
Come along! We're late already. * Come along! It's easy!
come apart to break into pieces:
The book just came apart in my hands. * (figurative) My whole life had come apart at the seams.
come around / round
1 (also come to) to become conscious again:
Your mother hasn't yet come round from the anaesthetic.
2 (of a date or a regular event) to happen again:
My birthday seems to come around quicker every year.
come around / round (to ...) to come to a place, especially sb's house, to visit for a short time:
Do come around and see us some time.
come around / round (to sth) to change your mood or your opinion:
He'll never come round to our way of thinking.
come at sb [no passive] to move towards sb as though you are going to attack them:
She came at me with a knife. * (figurative) The noise came at us from all sides.
come at sth to think about a problem, question, etc. in a particular way:
We're getting nowhere-let's come at it from another angle.
come away (from sth) to become separated from sth:
The plaster had started to come away from the wall.
come away with sth [no passive] to leave a place with a particular feeling or impression:
We came away with the distinct impression that all was not well with their marriage.
come back
1 to return:
You came back (= came home) very late last night. * The colour was coming back to her cheeks. * (figurative) United came back from being two goals down to win 32.
2 to become popular or successful again:
Long hair for men seems to be coming back in.
related noun COMEBACK (2)
come back (at sb) (with sth) to reply to sb forcefully or angrily:
She came back at the speaker with some sharp questions.
related noun COMEBACK (3)
come back (to sb) to return to sb's memory:
It's all coming back to me now. * Once you've been in France a few days, your French will soon come back.
come back to sth [no passive] to return to a subject, an idea, etc:
Let's come back to the point at issue. * It all comes back to a question of money.
come before sb/sth [no passive] (formal) to be presented to sb/sth for discussion or a decision:
The case comes before the court next week.
come between sb and sb [no passive] to damage a relationship between two people:
I'd hate anything to come between us.
come by (AmE) to make a short visit to a place, in order to see sb:
She came by the house.
come by sth
1 to manage to get sth:
Jobs are hard to come by these days.
2 to receive sth:
How did you come by that scratch on your cheek?
come down
1 to break and fall to the ground:
The ceiling came down with a terrific crash.
2 (of rain, snow, etc.) to fall:
The rain came down in torrents.
3 (of an aircraft) to land or fall from the sky:
We were forced to come down in a field.
4 if a price, a temperature, a rate, etc. comes down, it gets lower:
The price of gas is coming down. * Gas is coming down in price.
5 to decide and say publicly that you support or oppose sb:
The committee came down in support of his application.
6 to reach as far down as a particular point:
Her hair comes down to her waist.
come down (from ...) (BrE, formal) to leave a university, especially Oxford or Cambridge, at the end of a TERM or after finishing your studies
OPP COME UP (TO ...)
come down (from ...) (to ...) to come from one place to another, usually from the north of a country to the south, or from a larger place to a smaller one
come down on sb [no passive] (informal) to criticize sb severely or punish sb:
Don't come down too hard on her. * The courts are coming down heavily on young offenders.
come down (to sb) to have come from a long time in the past:
The name has come down from the last century.
come down to sth [no passive] to be able to be explained by a single important point:
What it comes down to is, either I get more money or I leave.
come down with sth [no passive] to get an illness that is not very serious:
I think I'm coming down with flu.
come forward to offer your help, services, etc:
Several people came forward with information. * Police have asked witnesses of the accident to come forward.
come from ... (not used in the progressive tenses) to have as your place of birth or the place where you live:
She comes from London. * Where do you come from?
come from sth
1 to start in a particular place or be produced from a particular thing:
Much of our butter comes from New Zealand. * This wool comes from goats, not sheep. * This poem comes from his new book. * Where does her attitude come from? * Where's that smell coming from? * He comes from a family of actors. * 'She doesn't try hard enough.' 'That's rich, coming from you (= you do not try hard either).
2 = COME OF STH
come in
1 when the TIDE comes in, it moves towards the land
OPP GO OUT
2 to finish a race in a particular position:
My horse came in last.
3 to become fashionable:
Long hair for men came in in the sixties.
4 to become available:
We're still waiting for copies of the book to come in.
5 to have a part in sth:
I understand the plan perfectly, but I can't see where I come in.
6 to arrive somewhere; to be received:
The train is coming in now. * News is coming in of a serious plane crash in France. * She has over a thousand pounds a month coming in from her investments.
7 to take part in a discussion:
Would you like to come in at this point, Susan?
8 (of a law or rule) to be introduced; to begin to be used
come in for sth [no passive] to receive sth, especially sth unpleasant:
The government's economic policies have come in for a lot of criticism.
come in (on sth) to become involved in sth:
If you want to come in on the deal, you need to decide now.
come into sth [no passive]
1 to be left money by sb who has died:
She came into a fortune when her uncle died.
2 to be important in a particular situation:
I've worked very hard to pass this exam-luck doesn't come into it.
come of / from sth to be the result of sth:
I made a few enquiries, but nothing came of it in the end. * [+ -ing]That comes of eating too much!
come off
1 to be able to be removed:
Does this hood come off? * That mark won't come off.
2 (informal) to take place; to happen:
Did the trip to Rome ever come off?
3 (informal) (of a plan, etc.) to be successful; to have the intended effect or result:
They had wanted it to be a surprise but the plan didn't come off.
4 ~ well, badly, etc. (informal) to be successful/not successful in a fight, contest, etc:
I thought they came off very well in the debate.
come off (sth)
1 to fall from sth:
to come off your bicycle / horse
2 to become separated from sth:
When I tried to lift the jug, the handle came off in my hand. * A button had come off my coat.
come off it (spoken) used to disagree with sb rudely:
Come off it! We don't have a chance.
come off sth [no passive] to stop taking medicine, a drug, alcohol, etc:
I've tried to get him to come off the tranquillizers.
come on
1 (of an actor) to walk onto the stage
2 (of a player) to join a team during a game:
Owen came on for Fowler ten minutes before the end of the game.
3 to improve or develop in the way you want:
The project is coming on fine.
4 used in orders to tell sb to hurry or to try harder:
Come on! We don't have much time. * Come on! Try once more.
5 used to show that you know what sb has said is not correct:
Oh, come on-you know that isn't true!
6 (usually used in the progressive tenses) (of an illness or a mood) to begin:
I can feel a cold coming on. * I think there's rain coming on. * [+ to inf] It came on to rain.
7 (of a TV programme, etc.) to start:
What time does the news come on?
8 to begin to operate:
Set the oven to come on at six. * When does the heating come on?
come on / upon sb/sth [no passive] (formal) to meet or find sb/sth by chance
come on to sb (informal) to behave in a way that shows sb that you want to have a sexual relationship with them
related noun COME-ON
come on to sth [no passive] to start talking about a subject:
I'd like to come on to that question later.
come out
1 when the sun, moon or stars come out, they appear:
The rain stopped and the sun came out.
2 (of flowers) to open:
The daffodils came out early this year.
3 to be produced or published:
When is her new novel coming out?
4 (of news, the truth, etc.) to become known:
The full story came out at the trial. * [+ that] It came out that he'd been telling lies.
5 if a photograph comes out, it is a clear picture when it is developed and printed:
The photos from our trip didn't come out.
6 to be shown clearly:
Her best qualities come out in a crisis.
7 when words come out, they are spoken:
I tried to say 'I love you,' but the words wouldn't come out.
8 to say publicly whether you agree or disagree with sth:
He came out against the plan. * In her speech, the senator came out in favour of a change in the law.
9 (BrE) to stop work and go on strike
10 to no longer hide the fact that you are HOMOSEXUAL
11 (of a young UPPER-CLASS girl, especially in the past) to be formally introduced into society
come out (of sth)
1 (of an object) to be removed from a place where it is fixed:
This nail won't come out.
2 (of dirt, a mark, etc.) to be removed from sth by washing or cleaning:
These ink stains won't come out of my dress. * Will the colour come out (= fade or disappear) if I wash it?
come out at sth [no passive] to add up to a particular cost or sum:
The total bill comes out at 」500.
come out in sth [no passive] (of a person) to become covered in spots, etc. on the skin:
Hot weather makes her come out in a rash.
come out of yourself to relax and become more confident and friendly with other people:
It was when she started drama classes that she really came out of herself.
come out of sth [no passive] to develop from sth:
The book came out of his experiences in India. * Rock music came out of the blues.
come out with sth [no passive] to say sth, especially sth surprising or rude:
He came out with a stream of abuse. * She sometimes comes out with the most extraordinary remarks.
come over
1 (BrE, informal) to suddenly feel sth:
[+ADJ] I suddenly came over all shy.
2 = COME ACROSS:
He came over well in the interview.
come over (to ...) to come to a place, especially sb's house, to visit for a short time
come over (to ...) (from ...) to travel from one place to another, usually over a long distance:
Why don't you come over to England in the summer? * Her grandparents came over from Ireland during the famine.
come over (to sth) to change from one side, opinion, etc. to another
come over sb [no passive] to affect sb:
A fit of dizziness came over her. * I can't think what came over me (= I do not know what caused me to behave in that way).
come round | come round (to sth) (BrE) = COME AROUND
come through (of news or a message) to arrive by telephone, radio, etc. or through an official organization:
A message is just coming through.
come through (sth) to get better after a serious illness or to avoid serious injury:
With such a weak heart she was lucky to come through the operation.
come through (with sth) to successfully do or complete sth that you have promised to do:
We were worried she wouldn't be able to handle it, but she came through in the end. * The bank finally came through with the money.
come to = COME AROUND (1)
come to yourself (old-fashioned) to return to your normal state
come to sb [no passive] (of an idea) to enter your mind:
The idea came to me in the bath. * [+ that] It suddenly came to her that she had been wrong all along.
come to sth [no passive]
1 to add up to sth:
The bill came to $30. * I never expected those few items to come to so much.
2 to reach a particular situation, especially a bad one:
The doctors will operate if it proves necessary-but it may not come to that. * Who'd have thought things would come to this (= become so bad or unpleasant)?
come together if two or more different people or things come together, they form a united group:
Three colleges have come together to create a new university. * Bits and pieces of things he'd read and heard were coming together, and he began to understand.
come under sth [no passive]
1 to be included in a particular group:
What heading does this come under?
2 to be a person that others are attacking or criticizing:
The head teacher came under a lot of criticism from the parents.
3 to be controlled or influenced by sth:
All her students came under her spell.
come up
1 (of plants) to appear above the soil:
The daffodils are just beginning to come up.
2 (of the sun) to rise:
We watched the sun come up.
3 to happen:
I'm afraid something urgent has come up. * We'll let you know if any vacancies come up.
4 to be mentioned or discussed:
The subject came up in conversation. * The question is bound to come up at the meeting.
5 (of an event or a time) to be going to happen very soon:
Her birthday is coming up soon.
6 to be dealt with by a court of law:
Her divorce case comes up next month.
7 if your number, name, ticket, etc. comes up in a betting game, it is chosen and you win sth
8 (spoken, informal) (usually used in the progressive tenses) to arrive; to be ready soon:
'Is lunch ready?' 'Coming up!'
come up (to ...) (BrE, formal) to arrive at a university, especially Oxford or Cambridge, at the beginning of a TERM or in order to begin your studies
OPP COME DOWN (FROM ...)
come up (to ...) (from ...) to come from one place to another, especially from the south of a country to the north or from a smaller place to a larger one:
Why don't you come up to Scotland for a few days?
come up (to sb) to move towards sb, in order to talk to them:
He came up to me and asked for a light.
come up against sb/sth [no passive] to be faced with or opposed by sb/sth:
We expect to come up against a lot of opposition to the plan.
come up for sth [no passive]
1 to be considered for a job, an important position, etc:
She comes up for re-election next year.
2 to be reaching the time when sth must be done:
His contract is coming up for renewal.
come up to sth [no passive]
1 to reach as far as a particular point:
The water came up to my neck.
2 to reach an acceptable level or standard:
His performance didn't really come up to his usual high standard. * Their trip to France didn't come up to expectations.
come up with sth [no passive] to find or produce an answer, a sum of money, etc:
She came up with a new idea for increasing sales. * How soon can you come up with the money?
come upon sb/sth = COME ON SB/STH
exclamation (old-fashioned) used when encouraging sb to be sensible or reasonable, or when showing slight disapproval:
Oh come now, things aren't as bad as all that. * Come, come, Miss Jones, you know perfectly well what I mean.
noun [U] (slang) SEMEN

Come at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Come \Come\, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n.
{Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS. kuman,
D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan.
komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr.
gam. [root]23. Cf. {Base}, n., {Convene}, {Adventure}.]
1. To move hitherward; to draw near; to approach the speaker,
or some place or person indicated; -- opposed to go.

Look, who comes yonder? --Shak.

I did not come to curse thee. --Tennyson.

2. To complete a movement toward a place; to arrive.

When we came to Rome. --Acts xxviii.
16.

Lately come from Italy. --Acts xviii.
2.

3. To approach or arrive, as if by a journey or from a
distance. ``Thy kingdom come.'' --Matt. vi. 10.

The hour is coming, and now is. --John. v. 25.

So quick bright things come to confusion. --Shak.

4. To approach or arrive, as the result of a cause, or of the
act of another.

From whence come wars? --James iv. 1.

Both riches and honor come of thee ! --1 Chron.
xxix. 12.

5. To arrive in sight; to be manifest; to appear.

Then butter does refuse to come. --Hudibras.

6. To get to be, as the result of change or progress; -- with
a predicate; as, to come untied.

How come you thus estranged? --Shak.

How come her eyes so bright? --Shak.

Note: Am come, is come, etc., are frequently used instead of
have come, has come, etc., esp. in poetry. The verb to
be gives a clearer adjectival significance to the
participle as expressing a state or condition of the
subject, while the auxiliary have expresses simply the
completion of the action signified by the verb.

Think not that I am come to destroy. --Matt. v.
17.

We are come off like Romans. --Shak.

The melancholy days are come, the saddest of the
year. --Bryant.

Note: Come may properly be used (instead of go) in speaking
of a movement hence, or away, when there is reference
to an approach to the person addressed; as, I shall
come home next week; he will come to your house to-day.
It is used with other verbs almost as an auxiliary,
indicative of approach to the action or state expressed
by the verb; as, how came you to do it? Come is used
colloquially, with reference to a definite future time
approaching, without an auxiliary; as, it will be two
years, come next Christmas; i. e., when Christmas shall
come.

They were cried In meeting, come next Sunday.
--Lowell.
Come, in the imperative, is used to excite attention,
or to invite to motion or joint action; come, let us
go. ``This is the heir; come, let us kill him.''
--Matt. xxi. 38. When repeated, it sometimes expresses
haste, or impatience, and sometimes rebuke. ``Come,
come, no time for lamentation now.'' --Milton.

{To come}, yet to arrive, future. ``In times to come.''
--Dryden. ``There's pippins and cheese to come.'' --Shak.

{To come about}.
(a) To come to pass; to arrive; to happen; to result; as,
how did these things come about?
(b) To change; to come round; as, the ship comes about.
``The wind is come about.'' --Shak.

On better thoughts, and my urged reasons, They
are come about, and won to the true side. --B.
Jonson.

{To come abroad}.
(a) To move or be away from one's home or country. ``Am
come abroad to see the world.'' --Shak.
(b) To become public or known. [Obs.] ``Neither was
anything kept secret, but that it should come
abroad.'' --Mark. iv. 22.

{To come across}, to meet; to find, esp. by chance or
suddenly. ``We come across more than one incidental
mention of those wars.'' --E. A. Freeman. ``Wagner's was
certainly one of the strongest and most independent
natures I ever came across.'' --H. R. Haweis.

{To come after}.
(a) To follow.
(b) To come to take or to obtain; as, to come after a
book.

{To come again}, to return. ``His spirit came again and he
revived.'' --Judges. xv. 19. -

{To come and go}.
(a) To appear and disappear; to change; to alternate.
``The color of the king doth come and go.'' --Shak.
(b) (Mech.) To play backward and forward.

{To come at}.
(a) To reach; to arrive within reach of; to gain; as, to
come at a true knowledge of ourselves.
(b) To come toward; to attack; as, he came at me with
fury.

{To come away}, to part or depart.

{To come between}, to intervene; to separate; hence, to cause
estrangement.

{To come by}.
(a) To obtain, gain, acquire. ``Examine how you came by
all your state.'' --Dryden.
(b) To pass near or by way of.

{To come down}.
(a) To descend.
(b) To be humbled.

{To come down upon}, to call to account, to reprimand.
[Colloq.] --Dickens.

{To come home}.
(a) To return to one's house or family.
(b) To come close; to press closely; to touch the
feelings, interest, or reason.
(c) (Naut.) To be loosened from the ground; -- said of an
anchor.

{To come in}.
(a) To enter, as a town, house, etc. ``The thief cometh
in.'' --Hos. vii. 1.
(b) To arrive; as, when my ship comes in.
(c) To assume official station or duties; as, when Lincoln
came in.
(d) To comply; to yield; to surrender. ``We need not fear
his coming in'' --Massinger.
(e) To be brought into use. ``Silken garments did not come
in till late.'' --Arbuthnot.
(f) To be added or inserted; to be or become a part of.
(g) To accrue as gain from any business or investment.
(h) To mature and yield a harvest; as, the crops come in
well.
(i) To have sexual intercourse; -- with to or unto. --Gen.
xxxviii. 16.
(j) To have young; to bring forth; as, the cow will come
in next May. [U. S.]

{To come in for}, to claim or receive. ``The rest came in for
subsidies.'' --Swift.

{To come into}, to join with; to take part in; to agree to;
to comply with; as, to come into a party or scheme.

{To come it over}, to hoodwink; to get the advantage of.
[Colloq.]

{To come} {near or nigh}, to approach in place or quality; to
be equal to. ``Nothing ancient or modern seems to come
near it.'' --Sir W. Temple.

{To come of}.
(a) To descend or spring from. ``Of Priam's royal race my
mother came.'' --Dryden.
(b) To result or follow from. ``This comes of judging by
the eye.'' --L'Estrange.

{To come off}.
(a) To depart or pass off from.
(b) To get free; to get away; to escape.
(c) To be carried through; to pass off; as, it came off
well.
(d) To acquit one's self; to issue from (a contest, etc.);
as, he came off with honor; hence, substantively, a
come-off, an escape; an excuse; an evasion. [Colloq.]
(e) To pay over; to give. [Obs.]
(f) To take place; to happen; as, when does the race come
off?
(g) To be or become after some delay; as, the weather came
off very fine.
(h) To slip off or be taken off, as a garment; to
separate.
(i) To hurry away; to get through. --Chaucer.

{To come off by}, to suffer. [Obs.] ``To come off by the
worst.'' --Calamy.

{To come off from}, to leave. ``To come off from these grave
disquisitions.'' --Felton.

{To come on}.
(a) To advance; to make progress; to thrive.
(b) To move forward; to approach; to supervene.

{To come out}.
(a) To pass out or depart, as from a country, room,
company, etc. ``They shall come out with great
substance.'' --Gen. xv. 14.
(b) To become public; to appear; to be published. ``It is
indeed come out at last.'' --Bp. Stillingfleet.
(c) To end; to result; to turn out; as, how will this
affair come out? he has come out well at last.
(d) To be introduced into society; as, she came out two
seasons ago.
(e) To appear; to show itself; as, the sun came out.
(f) To take sides; to take a stand; as, he came out
against the tariff.

Come \Come\, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n.
{Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS. kuman,
D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan.
komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr.
gam. [root]23. Cf. {Base}, n., {Convene}, {Adventure}.]
1. To move hitherward; to draw near; to approach the speaker,
or some place or person indicated; -- opposed to go.

Look, who comes yonder? --Shak.

I did not come to curse thee. --Tennyson.

2. To complete a movement toward a place; to arrive.

When we came to Rome. --Acts xxviii.
16.

Lately come from Italy. --Acts xviii.
2.

3. To approach or arrive, as if by a journey or from a
distance. ``Thy kingdom come.'' --Matt. vi. 10.

The hour is coming, and now is. --John. v. 25.

So quick bright things come to confusion. --Shak.

4. To approach or arrive, as the result of a cause, or of the
act of another.

From whence come wars? --James iv. 1.

Both riches and honor come of thee ! --1 Chron.
xxix. 12.

5. To arrive in sight; to be manifest; to appear.

Then butter does refuse to come. --Hudibras.

6. To get to be, as the result of change or progress; -- with
a predicate; as, to come untied.

How come you thus estranged? --Shak.

How come her eyes so bright? --Shak.

Note: Am come, is come, etc., are frequently used instead of
have come, has come, etc., esp. in poetry. The verb to
be gives a clearer adjectival significance to the
participle as expressing a state or condition of the
subject, while the auxiliary have expresses simply the
completion of the action signified by the verb.

Think not that I am come to destroy. --Matt. v.
17.

We are come off like Romans. --Shak.

The melancholy days are come, the saddest of the
year. --Bryant.

Note: Come may properly be used (instead of go) in speaking
of a movement hence, or away, when there is reference
to an approach to the person addressed; as, I shall
come home next week; he will come to your house to-day.
It is used with other verbs almost as an auxiliary,
indicative of approach to the action or state expressed
by the verb; as, how came you to do it? Come is used
colloquially, with reference to a definite future time
approaching, without an auxiliary; as, it will be two
years, come next Christmas; i. e., when Christmas shall
come.

They were cried In meeting, come next Sunday.
--Lowell.
Come, in the imperative, is used to excite attention,
or to invite to motion or joint action; come, let us
go. ``This is the heir; come, let us kill him.''
--Matt. xxi. 38. When repeated, it sometimes expresses
haste, or impatience, and sometimes rebuke. ``Come,
come, no time for lamentation now.'' --Milton.

{To come}, yet to arrive, future. ``In times to come.''
--Dryden. ``There's pippins and cheese to come.'' --Shak.

{To come about}.
(a) To come to pass; to arrive; to happen; to result; as,
how did these things come about?
(b) To change; to come round; as, the ship comes about.
``The wind is come about.'' --Shak.

On better thoughts, and my urged reasons, They
are come about, and won to the true side. --B.
Jonson.

{To come abroad}.
(a) To move or be away from one's home or country. ``Am
come abroad to see the world.'' --Shak.
(b) To become public or known. [Obs.] ``Neither was
anything kept secret, but that it should come
abroad.'' --Mark. iv. 22.

{To come across}, to meet; to find, esp. by chance or
suddenly. ``We come across more than one incidental
mention of those wars.'' --E. A. Freeman. ``Wagner's was
certainly one of the strongest and most independent
natures I ever came across.'' --H. R. Haweis.

{To come after}.
(a) To follow.
(b) To come to take or to obtain; as, to come after a
book.

{To come again}, to return. ``His spirit came again and he
revived.'' --Judges. xv. 19. -

{To come and go}.
(a) To appear and disappear; to change; to alternate.
``The color of the king doth come and go.'' --Shak.
(b) (Mech.) To play backward and forward.

{To come at}.
(a) To reach; to arrive within reach of; to gain; as, to
come at a true knowledge of ourselves.
(b) To come toward; to attack; as, he came at me with
fury.

{To come away}, to part or depart.

{To come between}, to intervene; to separate; hence, to cause
estrangement.

{To come by}.
(a) To obtain, gain, acquire. ``Examine how you came by
all your state.'' --Dryden.
(b) To pass near or by way of.

{To come down}.
(a) To descend.
(b) To be humbled.

{To come down upon}, to call to account, to reprimand.
[Colloq.] --Dickens.

{To come home}.
(a) To return to one's house or family.
(b) To come close; to press closely; to touch the
feelings, interest, or reason.
(c) (Naut.) To be loosened from the ground; -- said of an
anchor.

{To come in}.
(a) To enter, as a town, house, etc. ``The thief cometh
in.'' --Hos. vii. 1.
(b) To arrive; as, when my ship comes in.
(c) To assume official station or duties; as, when Lincoln
came in.
(d) To comply; to yield; to surrender. ``We need not fear
his coming in'' --Massinger.
(e) To be brought into use. ``Silken garments did not come
in till late.'' --Arbuthnot.
(f) To be added or inserted; to be or become a part of.
(g) To accrue as gain from any business or investment.
(h) To mature and yield a harvest; as, the crops come in
well.
(i) To have sexual intercourse; -- with to or unto. --Gen.
xxxviii. 16.
(j) To have young; to bring forth; as, the cow will come
in next May. [U. S.]

{To come in for}, to claim or receive. ``The rest came in for
subsidies.'' --Swift.

{To come into}, to join with; to take part in; to agree to;
to comply with; as, to come into a party or scheme.

{To come it over}, to hoodwink; to get the advantage of.
[Colloq.]

{To come} {near or nigh}, to approach in place or quality; to
be equal to. ``Nothing ancient or modern seems to come
near it.'' --Sir W. Temple.

{To come of}.
(a) To descend or spring from. ``Of Priam's royal race my
mother came.'' --Dryden.
(b) To result or follow from. ``This comes of judging by
the eye.'' --L'Estrange.

{To come off}.
(a) To depart or pass off from.
(b) To get free; to get away; to escape.
(c) To be carried through; to pass off; as, it came off
well.
(d) To acquit one's self; to issue from (a contest, etc.);
as, he came off with honor; hence, substantively, a
come-off, an escape; an excuse; an evasion. [Colloq.]
(e) To pay over; to give. [Obs.]
(f) To take place; to happen; as, when does the race come
off?
(g) To be or become after some delay; as, the weather came
off very fine.
(h) To slip off or be taken off, as a garment; to
separate.
(i) To hurry away; to get through. --Chaucer.

{To come off by}, to suffer. [Obs.] ``To come off by the
worst.'' --Calamy.

{To come off from}, to leave. ``To come off from these grave
disquisitions.'' --Felton.

{To come on}.
(a) To advance; to make progress; to thrive.
(b) To move forward; to approach; to supervene.

{To come out}.
(a) To pass out or depart, as from a country, room,
company, etc. ``They shall come out with great
substance.'' --Gen. xv. 14.
(b) To become public; to appear; to be published. ``It is
indeed come out at last.'' --Bp. Stillingfleet.
(c) To end; to result; to turn out; as, how will this
affair come out? he has come out well at last.
(d) To be introduced into society; as, she came out two
seasons ago.
(e) To appear; to show itself; as, the sun came out.
(f) To take sides; to take a stand; as, he came out
against the tariff.

Come \Come\, v. t.
To carry through; to succeed in; as, you can't come any
tricks here. [Slang]

{To come it}, to succeed in a trick of any sort. [Slang]

Come \Come\, n.
Coming. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

come at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

come
v 1: move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach
something or somebody; "He came singing down the road";
"Come with me to the Casbah"; "come down here!"; "come
out of the closet!"; "come into the room" [syn: {come up}]
[ant: {go}]
2: reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress; "She
arrived home at 7 o'clock"; "She didn't get to Chicago
until after midnight" [syn: {arrive}, {get}] [ant: {leave}]
3: come to pass; arrive, as in due course; "The first success
came three days later"; "It came as a shock"; "Dawn comes
early in June"
4: reach a state, relation, or condition; "The water came to a
boil"; "We came to understand the true meaning of life";
"Their anger came to a boil"; "I came to realize the true
meaning of life"
5: to be the product or result; "Melons come from a vine";
"Understanding comes from experience" [syn: {follow}]
6: enter or assume a condition, relation, use, or position; "He
came into contact with a terrorist group"; "The shoes came
untied"; "I came to see his point of view"; "her face went
red with anger"; "The knot came loose"; "Your wish will
come true"
7: be found or available; "These shoes come in three colors;
The furniture comes unassembled"
8: come forth; "A scream came from the woman's mouth"; "His
breath came hard" [syn: {issue forth}]
9: be a native of; "She hails from Kalamazoo" [syn: {hail}]
10: extend or reach; "The water came up to my waist"; "The
sleeves come to your knuckles"
11: exist or occur in a certain point in a series; "Next came
the student from France"
12: come from; be connected by a relationship of blood, for
example; "She was descended from an old Italian noble
family"; "he comes from humble origins" [syn: {derive}, {descend}]
13: cover a certain distance; "She came a long way"
14: come under, be classified or included; "fall into a
category"; "This comes under a new heading" [syn: {fall}]
15: happen as a result; "Nothing good will come of this"
16: add up in number or quantity; "The bills amounted to
$2,000"; "The bill came to $2,000" [syn: {total}, {number},
{add up}, {amount}]
17: develop into; "This idea will never amount to anything";
"nothing came of his grandiose plans" [syn: {add up}, {amount}]
18: be received; "News came in of the massacre in Rwanda" [syn:
{come in}]
19: come to one's mind; suggest itself; "It occurred to me that
we should hire another secretary"; "A great idea then
came to her" [syn: {occur}]
20: proceed or get along; "How is she doing in her new job?";
"How are you making out in graduate school?"; "He's come
a long way" [syn: {do}, {fare}, {make out}, {get along}]
21: experience orgasm; "she could not come because she was too
upset"
22: have a certain priority; "My family comes first"
[also: {came}]

come at English (WD) Of Explained:

Inter: also » Côme

English

Inter: slim-wikipedi » a

Etymology

From Inter: etyl » enm Inter: term » comen|lang=enm, Inter: term » cumen|lang=enm, from Inter: etyl » ang Inter: term » coman|lang=ang, Inter: term » cuman||to come, go, happen|lang=ang, from Inter: etyl » gem-pro|en Inter: recons » kwemanan||to come|lang=gem-pro, from Inter: etyl » ine-pro|en Inter: recons » gʷem-|lang=ine-pro, Inter: recons » gʷém-|lang=ine-pro, Inter: recons » gʷem-ye-||to come, go, be born|lang=ine-pro. Cognate with Inter: etyl » sco|- Inter: term » cum||to come|lang=sco, Inter: etyl » stq|- Inter: term » kuume||to come|lang=stq, Inter: etyl » fy|- Inter: term » komme||to come|lang=fy, Inter: etyl » nl|- Inter: term » komen||to come|lang=nl, Inter: etyl » de|- Inter: term » kommen||to come|lang=de, Inter: etyl » da|- Inter: term » komme||to come|lang=da, Inter: etyl » sv|- Inter: term » komma||to come|lang=sv, Inter: etyl » is|- Inter: term » koma||to come|lang=is, Latin Inter: term » venio|veniō|come, arrive|lang=la, Lithuanian Inter: term » gimti||to be born, come into the world, arrive|lang=lt, Avestan Inter: term » ||tr=ǰamaiti|to go|lang=ae, Sanskrit Inter: term » sc=Deva|गच्छति||tr=gácchati|to go|lang=sa.

Pronunciation

* Inter: a » UK Inter: IPA » /kʌm/|kʰɐm, Inter: enPR » kŭm, Inter: X-SAMPA » /kVm/|k_h6m
  • Inter: audio » En-uk-to come.ogg|Audio (UK)
  • Inter: a » US Inter: IPA » /kʌm/|kʰʌm, Inter: enPR » kŭm, Inter: X-SAMPA » /kVm/|k_hVm
  • Inter: audio » en-us-come.ogg|Audio (US)
  • Inter: rhymes » ʌm
  • Homophones: cum

    Verb

    Inter: en-verb » comes|coming|came|come or comen {{qualifier|archaic}}

  • Inter: intransitiv » e To move from further away to nearer to.
    1. : She’ll be coming ’round the mountain when she comes...
    2. Inter: intransitiv » e To arrive
    3. : The guests came at eight oclock.''
    4. Inter: intransitiv » e To appear, to manifest itself.
    5. : The pain in his leg comes and goes.
    6. Inter: intransitiv » e To take a position to something else in a sequence.
    7. : Which letter comes before Y?
    8. : Winter comes after autumn.
    9. Inter: intransitiv » e Inter: slan » g To achieve orgasm; to cum.
    10. : He came after a few minutes.
    11. Inter: copulative » figuratively|with close To approach a state of being or accomplishment.
    12. : They came very close to leaving on time.
    13. : His test scores came close to perfect.
    14. Inter: figuratively » with to To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something.
    15. : He came to SF literature a confirmed technophile, and nothing made him happier than to read a manuscript thick with imaginary gizmos and whatzits.
    16. Inter: context » copulative|archaic To become, to turn out to be.
    17. : He was a dream come true.

      Usage notes

      The phrase "dream come true" is a set phrase; the verb "come" in the sense "become" is archaic outside of that set phrase.


    The collocations “come with” and “come along” mean Inter: term » accompany, used as “Do you want to come with me?” and “Do you want to come along?” In the Midwestern American dialect, “come with” can occur without a following object, as in “Do you want to come with?” In this dialect, “with” can also be used in this way with some other verbs, such as “take with”. Examples of this may be found in plays by Chicagoan Inter: w » David Mamet, such as Inter: w » American Buffalo.Chicago Dialect This objectless use is not permissible in other dialects.

    Antonyms

    * leave, go

    Derived terms

    Inter: rel-top3 » Terms derived from come (verb)
    • come about
    • come across
    • come after
    • come aloft
    • come along
    • come around
    • come at
    • come back
    • come by


    Inter: rel-mid » 3
  • come clean
  • come down
  • come forward
  • come into
  • come into one's own
  • come off
  • come off it
  • come on
  • come out

  • Inter: rel-mid » 3
    • come out with
    • come short
    • come to
    • come through
    • come true
    • come up
    • come with
    • come with the territory
    • come what may


    Inter: rel-botto » m

    Translations

    Inter: trans-top » to move from further away to nearer to
  • Albanian: Inter: t- » sq|vij
  • Arabic: Inter: t- » ar|جاء|tr=jāʾa, Inter: t- » ar|حضر|tr=ḥáḍara, Inter: t+ » ar|أتى|tr=ʾatā
  • : Egyptian Arabic: Inter: tø » arz|جا|tr=gaa|sc=Arab
  • Armenian: Inter: t+ » hy|գալ|tr=gal|sc=Armn
  • Aromanian: Inter: t- » rup|vin, Inter: t- » rup|yin
  • Avestan: Inter: tø » ae|ǰamaiti
  • Bakhtiari: Inter: tø » bqi|اودن|tr=aweðen|sc=fa-Arab
  • Basque: Inter: t- » eu|etorri
  • Bavarian: Inter: tø » bar|kemma
  • Belarusian: Inter: t- » be|прыходзіць|tr=pryxódzic’|sc=Cyrl
  • Bulgarian: Inter: t+ » bg|идвам|tr=idvam
  • Burmese: Inter: t+ » my|လာ|tr=la|sc=Mymr
  • Catalan: Inter: t+ » ca|venir
  • Chinese:
  • : Mandarin: Inter: t- » cmn|來|sc=Hani, Inter: t- » cmn|来|tr=lái|sc=Hani
  • Crimean Tatar: Inter: tø » crh|kelmek
  • Czech: Inter: t+ » cs|přijít
  • Dalmatian: Inter: tø » dlm|vener
  • Danish: Inter: t- » da|komme
  • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|komen
  • Esperanto: Inter: t- » eo|veni
  • Estonian: Inter: t+ » et|tulema
  • Finnish: Inter: t+ » fi|tulla
  • French: Inter: t+ » fr|venir
  • Friulian: Inter: tø » fur|vignî
  • Galician: Inter: t+ » gl|vir
  • Georgian: Inter: t- » ka|მისვლა|tr=misvla|sc=Geor, Inter: t- » ka|ჩამოსვლა|tr=č'amosvla|sc=Geor
  • German: Inter: t+ » de|kommen
  • Greek: Inter: t+ » el|έρχομαι|tr=érchomai
  • Hebrew: Inter: t- » he|בא|tr=ba
  • Hindi: Inter: t+ » hi|आना|tr=ānā
  • Hungarian: Inter: t+ » hu|jön
  • Ido: Inter: t+ » io|venar
  • Indonesian: Inter: t+ » id|datang, Inter: t+ » id|datang|alt=mendatangi, Inter: t+ » id|datang|alt=mendatang, Inter: t+ » id|datang|alt=mendatangkan
  • Interlingua: Inter: t- » ia|venir
  • Irish: Inter: t- » ga|tar
  • Italian: Inter: t+ » it|venire
  • Japanese: Inter: t+ » ja|来る|tr=くる, kúru, Inter: t+ » ja|いらっしゃる|tr=irassharu Inter: qualifier » honorific, Inter: t- » ja|おいでになる|tr=o-ide-ni naru Inter: qualifier » honorific, Inter: t- » ja|参る|tr=まいる, mairu Inter: qualifier » humble
  • Khmer: Inter: t+ » km|មក|tr=mɔɔk|sc=Khmr
  • Korean: Inter: t+ » ko|오다|tr=oda|sc=Hang
  • Kurdish: Inter: t+ » ku|hatin, Inter: t- » ku|هاتن|sc=ku-Arab
  • Lao: Inter: t- » lo|ມາ|tr=maa|sc=Laoo
  • Latin: Inter: t+ » la|venio
  • Lojban: Inter: t+ » jbo|klama

  • Inter: trans-mi » d
    • Macedonian: Inter: t- » mk|доаѓа|tr=dóaǵa|sc=Cyrl, Inter: t- » mk|иде|tr=íde|sc=Cyrl
    • Malay: Inter: t+ » ms|datang, Inter: t- » ms|mari
    • Manchu: Inter: tø » mnc|jimbi|sc=Mong
    • Mongolian: Inter: t- » mn|ирэх|tr=irekh|sc=Cyrl
    • Neapolitan: Inter: tø » nap|venì
    • Norwegian: Inter: t+ » no|komme
    • Occitan: Inter: t+ » oc|venir, Inter: t- » oc|vir
    • Old English: Inter: t- » ang|cuman
    • Old Saxon: Inter: tø » osx|kuman
    • Pashto: Inter: t- » ps|راتلل|sc=ps-Arab
    • Persian: Inter: t+ » fa|آمدن|tr=âmadan
    • Pipil: Inter: tø » ppl|witz, Inter: tø » ppl|huitz
    • Polish: Inter: t+ » pl|przychodzić
    • Portuguese: Inter: t+ » pt|vir
    • Quechua: Inter: t+ » qu|hamuy
    • Rohingya: Inter: tø » rhg|ai
    • Romanian: Inter: t- » ro|veni
    • Romansch: Inter: t- » rm|vegnir, Inter: t- » rm|vagnir, Inter: t- » rm|neir, Inter: t- » rm|gnir
    • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|приходить|tr=prixodít’ Inter: imp » f, Inter: t+ » ru|прийти|tr=prijtí Inter: imp » f
    • Sardinian: Inter: t- » sc|bènnere, Inter: t- » sc|benni, Inter: t- » sc|bènniri, Inter: t- » sc|vènnere
    • Scots: Inter: tø » sco|cum
    • Scottish Gaelic: Inter: t- » gd|thig
    • Sicilian: Inter: t+ » scn|vèniri
    • Sinhalese: Inter: t- » si|එනවා|tr=enavā|sc=Sinh
    • Slovak: Inter: t- » sk|prichádzať, Inter: t- » sk|prísť
    • Slovene: Inter: t+ » sl|priti
    • Spanish: Inter: t+ » es|venir
    • Swahili: Inter: t- » sw|kuja
    • Swedish: Inter: t+ » sv|komma
    • Tajik: Inter: t- » tg|омадан|tr=omadan|sc=Cyrl
    • Tamil: Inter: t+ » ta|வா
    • Thai: Inter: t+ » th|มา|tr=maa
    • Tocharian A: Inter: tø » xto|kum-, Inter: tø » xto|käm-
    • Tocharian B: Inter: tø » txb|käm-
    • Tunisian Arabic: Inter: tø » aeb|جاء|tr=jaa'|sc=Arab
    • Turkish: Inter: t+ » tr|gelmek
    • Ukrainian: Inter: t+ » uk|приходити|tr=pryxódyty|sc=Cyrl
    • Urdu: Inter: t+ » ur|آنا|tr=ānā
    • Venetian: Inter: tø » vec|vegner
    • Vietnamese: Inter: t+ » vi|lại
    • Welsh: Inter: t+ » cy|dod
    • West Frisian: Inter: t- » fy|komme
    • Yiddish: Inter: t- » yi|קומען|tr=komen|sc=Hebr
    • Zazaki: Inter: tø » zza|amaene
    • Zulu: Inter: t- » zu|za|alt=-za


    Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » to arrive, to appear
    • Arabic: Inter: t+ » ar|قدم|tr=qádima|sc=Arab
    • Bulgarian: Inter: t+ » bg|пристигам, Inter: t- » bg|явявам се
    • Czech: Inter: t+ » cs|přijít
    • French: Inter: t+ » fr|arriver
    • Galician: Inter: t+ » gl|vir
    • German: Inter: t+ » de|kommen, Inter: t+ » de|ankommen
    • Hungarian: Inter: t+ » hu|megjön, Inter: t+ » hu|jön


    Inter: trans-mi » d
  • Macedonian: Inter: t- » mk|доаѓа|tr=dóaǵa|sc=Cyrl, Inter: t- » mk|пристига|tr=prístiga|sc=Cyrl
  • Norwegian: Inter: t- » no|ankomme, Inter: t+ » no|komme
  • Persian: Inter: t+ » fa|رسیدن|tr=ra(e)sidan|sc=fa-Arab
  • Scottish Gaelic: Inter: t- » gd|thig
  • Serbo-Croatian: Inter: t- » sh|doći
  • Tunisian Arabic: Inter: tø » aeb|وصل|tr=wuṣil|sc=Arab
  • Zulu: Inter: t- » zu|fika|alt=-fika

  • Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » to have a relative position in a sequence
    • Czech: Inter: t+ » cs|předejít
    • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|komen


    Inter: trans-mi » d
  • Hungarian: Inter: t+ » hu|jön
  • Turkish: Inter: t+ » tr|gelmek

  • Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » to orgasm
    • Bulgarian: Inter: t+ » bg|свършвам|tr=svarshvam
    • Catalan: Inter: t- » ca|escórrer-se
    • Chinese:
    • : Mandarin: Inter: t- » cmn|射|tr=shè|sc=Hani, Inter: t- » cmn|射精|tr=shèjīng|sc=Hani, Inter: qualifier » slang Inter: t » cmn|出水|tr=chūshuǐ|sc=Hani
    • Czech: Inter: t+ » cs|udělat se
    • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|klaarkomen
    • Esperanto: Inter: t- » eo|ĉuri
    • Finnish: Inter: t+ » fi|tulla, Inter: t- » fi|saada orgasmi
    • French: Inter: t+ » fr|jouir, Inter: t+ » fr|venir
    • German: Inter: t+ » de|kommen
    • Hungarian: Inter: t- » hu|elélvez
    • Icelandic: Inter: t- » is|fá það


    Inter: trans-mi » d
  • Icelandic: Inter: t- » is|fá það
  • Italian: Inter: t+ » it|venire
  • Japanese: Inter: t+ » ja|いく|tr=iku
  • Macedonian: Inter: t- » mk|свршува|tr=sv'ršuva|sc=Cyrl
  • Norwegian: Inter: t+ » no|komme
  • Polish: Inter: t+ » pl|dochodzić, Inter: t+ » pl|dojść
  • Portuguese: Inter: t+ » pt|gozar
  • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|кончать|tr=končát’ Inter: imp » f, Inter: t+ » ru|кончить|tr=kónčit’ Inter: pf » .
  • Serbo-Croatian: Inter: t- » sh|svršiti Inter: qualifier » colloquial
  • Spanish: Inter: t+ » es|correrse
  • Thai: Inter: t- » th|ถึงจุดสุดยอด|sc=Thai|tr=těung jùt sùt yôt, Inter: t+ » th|เสร็จ|sc=Thai|tr=sèt

  • Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » to become
    • Bulgarian: Inter: t- » bg|случвам се, Inter: t+ » bg|ставам
    • French: Inter: t+ » fr|devenir
    • Hungarian: Inter: t+ » hu|válik


    Inter: trans-mi » d
  • Macedonian: Inter: t- » mk|станува|tr=stánuva|sc=Cyrl
  • Vietnamese: Inter: t+ » vi|thành, Inter: t+ » vi|trở nên, Inter: t+ » vi|trở thành
  • Zulu: Inter: t- » zu|ba|alt=-ba

  • Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » to turn out to be
    • Hungarian: Inter: t- » hu|bizonyul


    Inter: trans-mi » d
    Inter: trans-botto » m

    See also

    * cam'st
    • kingdom come

      Noun

      Inter: en-noun » -


  • Inter: obsolet » e Coming, arrival; approach.
    1. 1869, RD Blackmoore, Lorna Doone, II:
    2. : “If we count three before the come of thee, thwacked thou art, and must go to the women.”
    3. Inter: slan » g Semen, or female ejaculatory discharge.

      See also

      * cum

      Preposition

      Inter: en-pre » p


  • when an event has occurred or a time has arrived
  • : Leave it to settle for about three months and, come Christmas time, youll have a delicious concoctions to offer your guests.''
  • Inter: quote-news » date=November 10 2012|author=Amy Lawrence|title=Fulham's Mark Schwarzer saves late penalty in dramatic draw at Arsenal|newspaper=The Guardian|url=http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/2012/nov/10/arsenal-fulham-premier-league
  • : Come the final whistle, Mikel Arteta lay flabbergasted on the turf.

    References

    Statistics

    * Inter: rank » old|came|men|107|come|without|make|def

  • Category: Category:English copulative verbs -
    Category: Category:English irregular past participles -
    Category: Category:English irregular verbs -
    Category: Category:English past participles -
    Category: Category:English prepositions -
    Category: Category:English terms with homophones -
    Category: Category:English verbs with base form identical to past participle -
    Category: Category:en:Behaviour -

    Galician

    Verb

    Inter: gl-verb-for » m
  • Inter: conjugation of » comer||3|s|pres|ind
    1. Inter: conjugation of » comer||2|s|imp


    Italian

    Pronunciation

    * Inter: IPA » ˈkome|lang=it
    • Inter: audio » It-come.ogg|Audio

      Etymology

      From Inter: etyl » la|it Inter: term » quomodo|lang=la + Inter: term » et|lang=la.


    Cognate to French Inter: term » comme|lang=fr. See also Spanish Inter: term » como|lang=es/Inter: term » cómo|lang=es and Catalan Inter: term » com|lang=ca.

    Adverb

    come
  • how
    1. : Come stai? Inter: qualifier » informal
    2. :: How are you?
    3. : Come sta? Inter: qualifier » formal
    4. :: How are you?
    5. as, like
    6. : Blu come il mare,
    7. :: As blue as the sea.

      Derived terms

      * come mai

  • come se

    Conjunction

    come

  • as soon as
    1. : Come arrivò... - As soon as he arrived...

      Anagrams

      * meco


    Category: Category:Italian adverbs -
    Category: Category:Italian conjunctions -

    Latin

    Adjective

    Inter: la-adj-form » cōme
  • Inter: inflection of » comis|cōmis|nom|n|s|lang=la
    1. Inter: inflection of » comis|cōmis|acc|n|s|lang=la
    2. Inter: inflection of » comis|cōmis|voc|n|s|lang=la


    Portuguese

    Pronunciation

    * Inter: hyphenation » co|me

    Verb

    come
  • Inter: pt-verb form of » comer|er|indicative|present|singular|third
    1. Inter: pt-verb form of » comer|er|imperative|affirmative|singular|second


    Spanish

    Etymology

    Latin comede (imperative), comedit (present).

    Pronunciation

    * Inter: X-SAMPA » /"kome/

    Verb

    Inter: es-verb-form » comer
  • third person singular present tense of comer 'to eat'
    1. second person singular imperative of comer


    Category: Category:200 English basic words -
    Category: ang:come -
    Translation: ar » come
    Translation: an » come
    Category: ast:come -
    Translation: az » come
    Translation: br » come
    Translation: cs » come
    Translation: cy » come
    Translation: de » come
    Translation: et » come
    Translation: el » come
    Translation: es » come
    Translation: eu » come
    Translation: fa » come
    Translation: fr » come
    Translation: gl » come
    Translation: ko » come
    Translation: hy » come
    Translation: hr » come
    Translation: io » come
    Translation: it » come
    Translation: kn » come
    Translation: kk » come
    Translation: ku » come
    Translation: lo » come
    Translation: la » come
    Translation: lb » come
    Translation: lt » come
    Translation: li » come
    Translation: hu » come
    Translation: mg » come
    Translation: ml » come
    Translation: my » come
    Translation: fj » come
    Translation: nl » come
    Translation: ja » come
    Translation: no » come
    Translation: pa » come
    Translation: pl » come
    Translation: pt » come
    Translation: ro » come
    Translation: ru » come
    Translation: sm » come
    Translation: sq » come
    Category: simple:come -
    Translation: fi » come
    Translation: sv » come
    Translation: tl » come
    Translation: ta » come
    Translation: te » come
    Translation: th » come
    Translation: tr » come
    Translation: uk » come
    Translation: vi » come
    Translation: wa » come
    Translation: zh » come

  • Côme at English (WD) Of Explained:

    Inter: also » come

    French

    Proper noun

    Inter: fr-proper noun » sort=come
  • Inter: given name » male|lang=fr, equivalent to English Cosmo.

  • Translation: pl » Côme
    Translation: th » Côme