Online Dictionary

creole Explained

creole at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

['kri:əul]

creole at English => English (English Etymology) Of Explained:

1604, from Fr. creole, from Sp. criollo "person native to a locality," from Port. crioulo, dim. of cria "person (especially a servant) raised in one's house," from criar "to raise or bring up," from L. creare "to produce, create." The exact sense varies with local use. Originally with no connotation of color or race; Fowler (1926) writes: "Creole does not imply mixture of race, but denotes a person either of European or (now rarely) of negro descent born and naturalized in certain West Indian and American countries." ///

creole at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

n [Date: 1700-1800; Language: French; Origin: creole, from Spanish, from Portuguese crioulo 'black person born in Brazil, home-born slave', from criar 'to breed', from Latin creare; CREATE]//
1 [U and C] a language that is a combination of a European language with one or more other languages: pidgin//
2 Creole [C] : a) someone whose family was originally from both Europe and Africa// b) someone whose family were originally French settlers in the southern US//
3 [U] food prepared in the spicy strong-tasting style of the southern US: --shrimp creole// -- creole adj //

creole at English => English (The Britannica Concise) Of Explained:

Any pidgin language that has become established as the native language of a speech community. A creole usually arises when speakers of one language become economically or politically dominant over speakers of another. A simplified or modified form of the dominant group's language (pidgin), used for communication between the two groups, may eventually become the native language of the less powerful community. Examples include Sea Island Creole (formerly Gullah, derived from English), spoken in S. Carolina's Sea Islands; Haitian Creole (derived from French); and Papiamento (derived from Spanish and Portuguese), spoken in Curaç ao, Aruba, and Bonaire.

In the 16th-18th cent., a person born in Spanish America of Spanish parents, as distinguished from one born in Spain but residing in America. Under Spanish colonial rule Creoles suffered from discrimination; it was consequently Creoles who led the 19th-cent. revolutions against Spain and became the new ruling class. Today Creole has widely varying meanings. In Louisiana it can mean either French-speaking white descendants of early French and Spanish settlers, or mixed-race people who speak a form of French and Spanish. In Latin America it may denote a local-born person of pure Spanish extraction or a member of the urban Europeanized classes as opposed to rural Indians. In the West Indies it refers to all people, regardless of ancestry, who are part of the Caribbean culture. See also Creole language.

Any pidgin language that has become established as the native language of a speech community. A creole usually arises when speakers of one language become economically or politically dominant over speakers of another. A simplified or modified form of the dominant group's language (pidgin), used for communication between the two groups, may eventually become the native language of the less powerful community. Examples include Sea Island Creole (formerly Gullah, derived from English), spoken in S. Carolina's Sea Islands; Haitian Creole (derived from French); and Papiamento (derived from Spanish and Portuguese), spoken in Curaç ao, Aruba, and Bonaire.

In the 16th-18th cent., a person born in Spanish America of Spanish parents, as distinguished from one born in Spain but residing in America. Under Spanish colonial rule Creoles suffered from discrimination; it was consequently Creoles who led the 19th-cent. revolutions against Spain and became the new ruling class. Today Creole has widely varying meanings. In Louisiana it can mean either French-speaking white descendants of early French and Spanish settlers, or mixed-race people who speak a form of French and Spanish. In Latin America it may denote a local-born person of pure Spanish extraction or a member of the urban Europeanized classes as opposed to rural Indians. In the West Indies it refers to all people, regardless of ancestry, who are part of the Caribbean culture. See also Creole language.

creole at English => English (English Thesaurus) Of Explained:

[N] (Extraneousness): extraneousness, exteriority, otherness, exoticism, foreign body, foreign substance, foreign element, alien, stranger, intruder, interloper, foreigner, newcomer, immigrant, emigrant, creole, outsider.

Creole at English => English (Oxford Advanced Learners) Of Explained:

(also creole) noun
1 [C] a person of mixed European and African race, especially one who lives in the West Indies
2 [C] a person whose ancestors were among the first Europeans who settled in the West Indies or Spanish America, or one of the French or Spanish people who settled in the southern states of the US:
Creole cookery
3 [U] a language formed from a mixture of a European language with a local language (especially an African language spoken by SLAVES in the West Indies)
see also PIDGIN

Creole at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Creole \Cre"ole\ (kr?"?l), n. [F. cr?ole, Sp. criollo, from an
American negro word, perh. a corruption of a Sp. criadillo,
dim. of criado servant, formerly also, child, fr. L. creatus,
p. p. of creare to create. Cf. {Create}.]
One born of European parents in the American colonies of
France or Spain or in the States which were once such
colonies, esp. a person of French or Spanish descent, who is
a native inhabitant of Louisiana, or one of the States
adjoining, bordering on the Gulf of of Mexico.

Note: ``The term creole negro is employed in the English West
Indies to distinguish the negroes born there from the
Africans imported during the time of the slave trade.
The application of this term to the colored people has
led to an idea common in some parts of the United
States, though wholly unfounded, that it implies an
admixture greater or less of African blood.'' --R.
Hildreth.

Note: ``The title [Creole] did not first belong to the
descendants of Spanish, but of French, settlers, But
such a meaning implied a certain excellence of origin,
and so came early to include any native of French or
Spanish descent by either parent, whose nonalliance
with the slave race entitled him to social rank. Later,
the term was adopted by, not conceded to, the natives
of mixed blood, and is still so used among themselves.
. . . Besides French and Spanish, there are even, for
convenience of speech, 'colored' Creoles; but there are
no Italian, or Sicilian, nor any English, Scotch,
Irish, or 'Yankee' Creoles, unless of parentage married
into, and themselves thoroughly proselyted in, Creole
society.'' --G. W. Cable.

Creole \Cre"ole\ (kr?"?l), a.
Of or pertaining to a Creole or the Creoles.

Note: In New Orleans the word Creole is applied to any
product, or variety of manufacture, peculiar to
Louisiana; as, Creole ponies, chickens, cows, shoes,
eggs, wagons, baskets, etc.

Creole at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

Creole
n 1: a person of European descent born in the West Indies or
Latin America
2: a person descended from French ancestors in southern United
States (especially Louisiana)
3: a mother tongue that originates from contact between two
languages

Creole
adj 1: of or relating to a language that arises from contact
between two other languages and has features of both;
"Creole grammars"
2: of or relating to or characteristic of native-born persons
of French descent in Louisiana; "Creole cooking"

creole at English (WD) Of Explained:

Inter: also » créole|Creole

English

Inter: wikipedia » Creole language

Etymology

An adaptation of the Castilian Inter: etyl » es Inter: term » criollo|lang=es||homey, local yokel, from Inter: etyl » pt Inter: term » crioulo|lang=pt, diminutive of Inter: term » cria|lang=pt||person raised in one’s house, servant, from Inter: etyl » pt Inter: term » criar|lang=pt||to rear, to bring up, from Inter: etyl » la Inter: term » creo|lang=la||to create, which came into English via Inter: etyl » fr between 1595 and 1605.

Pronunciation

* Inter: a » UK Inter: IPA » /ˈkriəʊl/, Inter: X-SAMPA » /"kri@Ul/
  • Inter: audio » en-uk-creole.ogg|Audio (UK)
  • Inter: rhymes » iəʊl
  • Inter: a » US Inter: enPR » krēʹōl, Inter: IPA » /ˈkrioʊl/, Inter: X-SAMPA » /"krioUl/
  • Inter: audio » en-us-creole.ogg|Audio (US)
  • Inter: rhymes » ioʊl

    Noun

    Inter: en-nou » n

  • Inter: context » linguistics A dialect formed from two languages which has developed from a pidgin to become a first language.

    Derived terms

    * creolisation, creolization
    • creolise, creolize
    • creoloid
    • post-creole continuum

      Translations

      Inter: trans-top » dialect formed from two languages
    • Antillean Creole: Inter: tø » gcf|kréyol
    • Catalan: Inter: t- » ca|crioll|m
    • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|creools|n
    • Esperanto: Inter: t- » eo|kreolo
    • Finnish: Inter: t- » fi|kreoli
    • French: Inter: t+ » fr|créole|m
    • German: Inter: t+ » de|Kreolsprache|f
    • Haitian Creole: Inter: tø » ht|kreyòl


    Inter: trans-mi » d
  • Italian: Inter: t+ » it|creolo
  • Krio: Inter: tø » kri|krio
  • Macedonian: Inter: t- » mk|креол|m|tr=kréol
  • Pijin: Inter: tø » pis|pijin
  • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|креол|m|tr=kreól, Inter: t- » ru|креолизованный язык|m|tr=kreolizóvannyj jazyk
  • Spanish: Inter: t+ » es|criollo|m
  • Swedish: Inter: t+ » sv|kreol|c
  • Tok Pisin: Inter: t+ » tpi|pisin

  • Inter: trans-botto » m

    External links

    * Haitian Creole – English Dictionary: from Webster’s Dictionary – the Rosetta Edition.

    Italian

    Pronunciation

    * Inter: IPA » /ˈkrɛːole/|lang=it
    • Inter: audio » it-creole.ogg|Audio (IT)
    • Inter: rhymes » ɛːole|lang=it

      Adjective

      creole {{f}}


  • Feminine plural form of creolo

    Anagrams

    * celerò
  • ercole, Ercole

  • Category: Category:Italian adjective forms -
    Translation: ar » creole
    Translation: ca » creole
    Translation: es » creole
    Translation: fr » creole
    Translation: ko » creole
    Translation: io » creole
    Translation: it » creole
    Translation: mg » creole
    Translation: no » creole
    Translation: pl » creole
    Translation: ru » creole
    Translation: ta » creole
    Translation: te » creole
    Translation: tr » creole
    Translation: vi » creole
    Translation: zh » creole

    Creole at English (WD) Of Explained:

    Inter: also » creole|créole

    English

    Inter: wikipedi » a
    Inter: rfc » the definitions are too narrow, there are many more Creole peoples

    Etymology

    An adaptation of the Castilian Inter: etyl » es Inter: term » criollo|lang=es||homey, local yokel, from Inter: etyl » pt Inter: term » crioulo|lang=pt, diminutive of Inter: term » cria|lang=pt||person raised in one’s house, servant, from Inter: etyl » pt Inter: term » criar|lang=pt||to rear, to bring up, from Inter: etyl » la Inter: term » creo|lang=la||to create, which came into English via Inter: etyl » fr between 1595 and 1605.

    Pronunciation

    * Inter: a » UK Inter: IPA » /ˈkriəʊl/, Inter: X-SAMPA » /"kri@Ul/
    • Inter: a » US Inter: enPR » krēʹōl, Inter: IPA » /ˈkrioʊl/, Inter: X-SAMPA » /"krioUl/
    • Inter: audio » en-uk-creole.ogg|Audio (UK)

      Noun

      Inter: en-nou » n


  • A member of a French- Native Indian-African Spanish ethnic group in Louisiana.

    Translations

    Inter: trans-top » member of this ethnic group
  • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|creool|m
  • Finnish: Inter: t- » fi|kreoli
  • Hebrew: Inter: t- » he|קריאולי|m|tr=kreóli|sc=Hebr
  • Hungarian: Inter: t- » hu|kreol

  • Inter: trans-mi » d
    • Italian: Inter: t+ » it|creolo
    • Polish: Inter: t- » pl|Kreol|m, Inter: t- » pl|Kreolka|f
    • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|креол|m|tr=kreól, Inter: t+ » ru|креолка|f|tr=kreólka


    Inter: trans-botto » m

    Proper noun

    Inter: en-proper nou » n
  • A French-African ethnic group in Louisiana.
    1. Inter: non-gloss definition » Used as a proper noun denoting any specific creole language, especially that of Haiti.
    2. : She grew up speaking Creole.

      Translations

      Inter: trans-top » French-African ethnic group in Louisiana

  • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|creolen||p
  • Finnish: Inter: t- » fi|kreolit

  • Inter: trans-mi » d
    • Hungarian: Inter: t- » hu|kreol
    • Italian: Inter: t+ » it|creolo


    Inter: trans-botto » m

    External links

    * Ethnologue list of Creoles
    Translation: fr » Creole
    Translation: io » Creole
    Translation: hu » Creole
    Translation: mg » Creole
    Translation: pl » Creole

    créole at English (WD) Of Explained:

    Inter: also » creole|Creole

    French

    Etymology

    An adaptation of the Castilian Inter: etyl » es|fr Inter: term » criollo|lang=es||homey, local yokel, from Inter: etyl » pt|fr Inter: term » crioulo|lang=pt, diminutive of Inter: term » cria|lang=pt||person raised in one’s house, servant, from Inter: etyl » pt|fr Inter: term » criar|lang=pt||to rear, to bring up, from Inter: etyl » la|fr Inter: term » creo|lang=la||to create

    Pronunciation

    * Inter: IPA » /kʁe.ɔl/|lang=fr Inter: X-SAMPA » /kRe.Ol/
  • Inter: audio » Fr-Paris--créole.ogg|Audio (Paris)
  • Inter: rhymes » ɔl|lang=fr
  • Inter: homophones » créoles|lang=fr

    Noun

    Inter: fr-noun » mf|sort=creole

  • Creole

    Noun

    Inter: fr-noun » m|sort=creole

  • Inter: linguistics » lang=fr creole language

    Anagrams

    * colère
    • éclore


    Translation: ca » créole
    Translation: el » créole
    Translation: fr » créole
    Translation: ko » créole
    Translation: io » créole
    Translation: mg » créole
    Translation: pt » créole
    Translation: fi » créole
    Translation: vi » créole