Online Dictionary

disrelish Explained

Disrelish at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Disrelish \Dis*rel"ish\ (?; see {Dis-}), n.
1. Want of relish; dislike (of the palate or of the mind);
distaste; a slight degree of disgust; as, a disrelish for
some kinds of food.

Men love to hear of their power, but have an extreme
disrelish to be told of their duty. --Burke.

2. Absence of relishing or palatable quality; bad taste;
nauseousness. --Milton.

Disrelish \Dis*rel"ish\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disrelished}; p.
pr. & vb. n. {Disrelishing}.]
1. Not to relish; to regard as unpalatable or offensive; to
feel a degree of disgust at. --Pope.

2. To deprive of relish; to make nauseous or disgusting in a
slight degree. --Milton.

disrelish at English (WD) Of Explained:

==English==

Etymology

From Inter: prefix » dis|relish.

Pronunciation

*Inter: a » UK Inter: IPA » /dɪsˈɹɛlɪʃ/

Noun

Inter: en-noun » -
  • A lack of relish: distaste
    1. Inter: quote-book » year=1690|author=John Locke|title=An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume I.|chapter=|edition=|url=http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/10615


    |passage=Bread or tobacco may be neglected where they are shown to be useful to health, because of an indifferency or disrelish to them; reason and consideration at first recommends, and begins their trial, and use finds, or custom makes them pleasant.
  • Inter: quote-book » year=1818|author=John Franklin|title=The Journey to the Polar Sea|chapter=|edition=|url=http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/13518

  • |passage=The residents live principally upon this most delicious fish which fortunately can be eaten a long time without disrelish.
    1. 1819, Translation: :w » John Keats|John Keats, Otho the Great, Act IV, Scene II, verses 40-42
    2. : … that those eyes may glow
    3. : With wooing light upon me, ere the Morn
    4. : Peers with disrelish, grey, barren, and cold.
    5. Inter: quote-book » year=1872|author=J. Fenimore Cooper|title=The Bravo|chapter=|edition=|url=http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/10363


    |passage="I have no other malice against the race, Signore, than the wholesome disrelish of a Christian.
  • 1982, Inter: w » Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 685:
  • :They heated up tinned food in a saucepan of hot water and ate it with sadness and disrelish, under the belief that they were economising.

    Verb

    Inter: en-verb » disrelishes|disrelishing|disrelished

  • Inter: transitiv » e To have no taste for; to reject as distasteful.
    1. : Inter: rfquotek » Alexander Pope
    2. Inter: transitiv » e To deprive of relish; to make nauseous or disgusting in a slight degree.
    3. : Inter: rfquotek » Milton


    Translation: et » disrelish
    Translation: io » disrelish
    Translation: my » disrelish
    Translation: te » disrelish
    Translation: vi » disrelish
    Translation: zh » disrelish