Online Dictionary

magic Explained

magic at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

['mædʒık]

magic at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

n [U] [Date: 1300-1400; Language: French; Origin: magique, from Latin magice, from Greek magike, from magos 'person with magic powers']//
1 the ability of particular people in children's stories to make impossible things happen by saying special words: --Do you believe in magic?// black magic, white magic//
2 a special, attractive, or exciting quality: --Paris has lost some of its magic for me over the years.// magic of// --the magic of Christmas//
3 the skill of doing tricks that look like magic in order to entertain people, or the tricks that are done: conjuring//
4 like magic/as if by magic: in a surprising way that seems impossible to explain// --As if by magic the waiter suddenly appeared with a tray of drinks.//
5 work/weave your magic: if something or someone works or weaves their magic, they produce a good change or effect in a way that they are often able to do// --The warm weather and the beautiful scenery began to work their magic and she started to relax.//
6 work like magic: to be very effective//
magic 2 adj
1 [only before noun] in stories, a magic word or object has special powers that make the person using it able to do impossible things: --a book of magic spells // --a magic sword//
2 relating to the skill of doing tricks to entertain people: --His best magic trick is sawing a lady in half.//
3 magic number/word: a number or word that is particularly important or desired in a particular situation// --The magic words 'a million pounds' will get everyone's attention.//
4 the magic word: the word 'please' - used when speaking to children// --What's the magic word then, Katie?//
5 magic touch: a special ability to make things work well or to make people happy// --She's got a magic touch with babies.//
6 magic moment: a short time which seems beautiful and special// --She didn't want to spoil this magic moment.//
7 magic circle: a group of powerful people who are friendly with each other and help each other// --His outspokenness denied him access to the magic circle and he was never given high office.//
8 BrE spoken very good or very enjoyable: great// --'Did you have a good time?' 'Yeah, it was magic!'//
magic 3 v past tense and past participle magicked present participle magicking BrE // magic away [magic sb/sth away] phr v// to make someone or something disappear or go somewhere by using magic// --I wish I could magic us away to a warm beach.// magic up [magic sth → up] phr v// to make something appear suddenly and unexpectedly//

magic at English => English (The Britannica Concise) Of Explained:

Use of means (such as charms or spells) believed to have supernatural power over natural forces. It constitutes the core of many religious systems and plays a central social role in many nonliterate cultures. Magic is often distinguished from religion as being more impersonal and mechanical and emphasizing technique. Its techniques are usually regarded as means to specific ends (an enemy's defeat, rainfall, etc.), although another view ascribes a more symbolic, expressive character to such activity. Thus, a rainmaking ritual may both elicit rainfall and stress the symbolic importance of rain and the agricultural activities associated with it. Both the magician and the magical rite are typically surrounded by taboos, purification procedures, and other activities that draw the participants into the magical sphere. Strains of magic in Western tradition, formerly associated with heretics, alchemists, witches, and sorcerers, persist in modern times in the activities of satanists and others. The art of entertaining by performing apparently magical feats (sometimes called conjuring) relies on the use of slight of hand and other means. See also ritual, shamanism, voodoo, witchcraft and sorcery.

MAGIC at English => English (devils) Of Explained:

guan3cafe
coffee shopga1 li2currydong1boom (of a drum)qi4to whisper
to blame, to slanderer4space between mouth and earse4beat a drum
startledie2gnaw
bitex

magic at English => English (Moby Thesaurus II) Of Explained:

135 Moby Thesaurus words for "magic":
Prospero, abracadabra, airiness, alchemy, allure, allurement,
appearance, augury, aura, bewitchery, bewitching, bewitchment,
black art, black magic, blaze of glory, brilliance, brilliancy,
charisma, charm, charming, conjuring, delusiveness, demonolatry,
devilry, deviltry, diablerie, diabolism, divination, divining,
enchanting, enchantment, ensorcellment, entrancing, envelope,
exorcism, extraordinary, fallaciousness, false appearance,
false light, false show, falseness, fascinating, fascination,
fetishism, glamor, glamour, glory, gramarye, halo, hocus-pocus,
hoodoo, hypnotic, idealization, illusion, illusionism, illusionist,
illusiveness, illustriousness, immateriality, incantation, juju,
jujuism, legerdemain, luster, magian, magic act, magic show,
magical, magician, magnetic, magnetism, marvelous, mesmerizing,
miraculous, mumbo-jumbo, mystic, mystique, natural magic,
necromancy, necromantic, nimbus, numinousness, obeah, occult,
occultism, prestidigitation, prodigious, radiance, remarkable,
resplendence, resplendency, rune, satanism, seeming, semblance,
shamanism, shamanistic, show, simulacrum, sleight of hand,
soothsaying, sorcerer, sorcerous, sorcery, sortilege,
specious appearance, spell, spellbinding, spellcasting, splendor,
stupendous, sympathetic magic, thaumaturgia, thaumaturgics,
thaumaturgism, thaumaturgy, theurgy, trickery, unactuality,
unbelievable, unprecedented, unreality, unsubstantiality,
vampirism, voodoo, voodooism, wanga, white magic, witchcraft,
witchery, witching, witchwork, witchy, wizardly, wizardry

magic at English => English (English Thesaurus) Of Explained:

[N] (Deception): slight of hand, legerdemain, prestidigitation, magic, conjuring, conjuration, hocus-pocus, trickery, chicanery, treachery.

[N] (Sorcery): sorcery, occult art, occult sciences, magic, the black arts, necromancy, witchcraft, witchery, voodooism, exorcism, enchantment, mysticism.

[ADJ] (Sorcery): magic, magical, mystic, weird, cabalistic, incantatory, charmed, occult.

[N] (Sorcery): sorcery, occult art, occult sciences, magic, the black arts, necromancy, witchcraft, witchery, voodooism, exorcism, enchantment, mysticism.

[ADJ] (Sorcery): magic, magical, mystic, weird, cabalistic, incantatory,

Magic at English => English (Eastons 1897 Bible) Of Explained:

d, restoring, restorative, recuperative, curative, remedial, restorable, recoverable, remediable, retrievable, curable.

[ADJ] (Relief): relieving, consolatory, soothing, assuaging, balsamic, lenitive, palliative, anodyne, remedial, curative.[N] (Restraint): restraint, hindrance, constraint, repression, suppression, discipline, control, imprisonment, incarceration, entombment, captivity, blockade, arrest, custody, keep, care, charge, ward, curb, limitation, restriction, punishment.

[V] (Restraint): restrain, check, enthrall, restrict, hinder, constrain, coerce, compel, curb, control, repress, suppress, captivate, imprison,

[N] (Restraint): restraint, hindrance, constraint, repression, suppression, discipline, control, imprisonment, incarceration, entombment, captivity, blockade, arrest, custody, keep, care, charge, ward, curb, limitation, restriction, punishment.

[V] (Restraint): restrain, check, enthrall, restrict, hinder, constrain, coerce, compel, curb, control, repress, suppress, captivate, imprison, punishment.[V] (Health): be in full bloom, flourish, enjoy good health, recover, get better, improve, cure, restore.

[N] (Remedy): remedy, help, cure, redress, medicine, therapy, diagnosis, examination, treatment, surgery, prophylactic, corrective, restorative, sedative, palliative.

[V] (Preservation): preserve, maintain, keep, sustain, support, hold, keep up, keep alive, nurse, save, rescue, take care of, care, guard, defend, em

magic at English => English (Oxford Advanced Learners) Of Explained:

noun, adjective, verb
noun [U]
1 the secret power of appearing to make impossible things happen by saying special words or doing special things:
Do you believe in magic? * a place of secret shadows and ancient magic * He suddenly appeared as if by magic. * A passage was cleared through the crowd like magic.
see also BLACK MAGIC
2 the art of doing tricks that seem impossible in order to entertain people
SYN CONJURING
3 a special quality or ability that sb/sth has, that seems too wonderful to be real:
dance and music which capture the magic of India * He loved the magic and mystery of the place. * Like all truly charismatic people he can work his magic on both men and women. * Our year in Italy was pure / sheer magic. * He's returning to the team this season, hoping that the old magic can be made to work once more.
IDIOMS see WEAVE v.
adjective
1 having or using special powers to make impossible things happen or seem to happen:
a magic spell / charm / potion / trick * There is no magic formula for passing exams-only hard work.
2 (informal) having a special quality that makes sth seem wonderful:
It was a magic moment when the two sisters were reunited after 30 years. * She has a magic touch with the children and they do everything she asks. * Trust is the magic ingredient in our relationship.
3 [not before noun] (BrE, informal) very good or enjoyable:
'What was the trip like?' 'Magic!'
verb (-ck-) [VN +adv./prep.] to make sb/sth appear somewhere, disappear or turn into sth, by magic, or as if by magic:
Three goal scoring chances were conjured up by Swindon, only to be magicked away by Leicester. * He played an early little sonata of Mozart's, which he magicked into a masterpiece with his deft touch.

Magic at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Magic \Mag"ic\, Magical \Mag"ic*al\, a. [L. magicus, Gr. ?, fr.
?: cf. F. magique. See {Magi}.]
1. Pertaining to the hidden wisdom supposed to be possessed
by the Magi; relating to the occult powers of nature, and
the producing of effects by their agency.

2. Performed by, or proceeding from, occult and superhuman
agencies; done by, or seemingly done by, enchantment or
sorcery. Hence: Seemingly requiring more than human power;
imposing or startling in performance; producing effects
which seem supernatural or very extraordinary; having
extraordinary properties; as, a magic lantern; a magic
square or circle.

The painter's magic skill. --Cowper.

Note: Although with certain words magic is used more than
magical, -- as, magic circle, magic square, magic wand,
-- we may in general say magic or magical; as, a magic
or magical effect; a magic or magical influence, etc.
But when the adjective is predicative, magical, and not
magic, is used; as, the effect was magical.

{Magic circle}, a series of concentric circles containing the
numbers 12 to 75 in eight radii, and having somewhat
similar properties to the magic square.

{Magic humming bird} (Zo["o]l.), a Mexican humming bird
({Iache magica}), having white downy thing tufts.

{Magic lantern}. See {Lantern}.

{Magic square}, numbers so disposed in parallel and equal
rows in the form of a square, that each row, taken
vertically, horizontally, or diagonally, shall give the
same sum, the same product, or an harmonical series,
according as the numbers taken are in arithmetical,
geometrical, or harmonical progression.

{Magic wand}, a wand used by a magician in performing feats
of magic.

Magic \Mag"ic\, n. [OE. magique, L. magice, Gr. ? (sc. ?), fr.
?. See {Magic}, a., and {Magi}.]
A comprehensive name for all of the pretended arts which
claim to produce effects by the assistance of supernatural
beings, or departed spirits, or by a mastery of secret forces
in nature attained by a study of occult science, including
enchantment, conjuration, witchcraft, sorcery, necromancy,
incantation, etc.

An appearance made by some magic. --Chaucer.

{Celestial magic}, a supposed supernatural power which gave
to spirits a kind of dominion over the planets, and to the
planets an influence over men.

{Natural magic}, the art of employing the powers of nature to
produce effects apparently supernatural.

{Superstitious}, or {Geotic}, {magic}, the invocation of
devils or demons, involving the supposition of some tacit
or express agreement between them and human beings.

Syn: Sorcery; witchcraft; necromancy; conjuration;
enchantment.

magic at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Magic \Mag"ic\, n. [OE. magique, L. magice, Gr. ? (sc. ?), fr.
?. See {Magic}, a., and {Magi}.]
A comprehensive name for all of the pretended arts which
claim to produce effects by the assistance of supernatural
beings, or departed spirits, or by a mastery of secret forces
in nature attained by a study of occult science, including
enchantment, conjuration, witchcraft, sorcery, necromancy,
incantation, etc.

An appearance made by some magic. --Chaucer.

{Celestial magic}, a supposed supernatural power which gave
to spirits a kind of dominion over the planets, and to the
planets an influence over men.

{Natural magic}, the art of employing the powers of nature to
produce effects apparently supernatural.

{Superstitious}, or {Geotic}, {magic}, the invocation of
devils or demons, involving the supposition of some tacit
or express agreement between them and human beings.

Syn: Sorcery; witchcraft; necromancy; conjuration;
enchantment.

magic at English => English (Computer) Of Explained:

MAGIC

An early system on the {Midac} computer.

[Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959)].

[{Jargon File}]

(1995-01-25)

magic

1. As yet unexplained, or too complicated to explain; compare
{automagically} and (Arthur C.) Clarke's Third Law:

Any sufficiently advanced technology is
indistinguishable from magic.

"TTY echoing is controlled by a large number of magic bits."
"This routine magically computes the parity of an 8-bit byte
in three instructions."

2. Characteristic of something that works although no one
really understands why (this is especially called {black
magic}).

3. (Stanford) A feature not generally publicised that allows
something otherwise impossible or a feature formerly in that
category but now unveiled.

Compare {wizardly}, {deep magic}, {heavy wizardry}.

For more about hackish "magic" see {Magic Switch Story}.

4. {magic number}.

[{Jargon File}]

(2001-03-19)

magic at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

magic
n 1: any art that invokes supernatural powers
2: an illusory feat; considered magical by naive observers
[syn: {magic trick}, {conjuring trick}, {trick}, {legerdemain},
{conjuration}, {illusion}, {deception}]

magic
adj : possessing or using or characteristic of or appropriate to
supernatural powers; "charming incantations"; "magic
signs that protect against adverse influence"; "a
magical spell"; "'tis now the very witching time of
night"- Shakespeare; "wizard wands"; "wizardly powers"
[syn: {charming}, {magical}, {sorcerous}, {witching(a)},
{wizard(a)}, {wizardly}]

magic at English (WD) Of Explained:

Inter: also » Magic

English

Inter: wikipedia » lang=en

Alternative forms

* magick Inter: qualifier » fantasy|occult Used as a deliberate archaism; used for supernatural magic, as distinguished from stage magic.
  • magicke Inter: qualifier » obsolete
  • magique Inter: qualifier » obsolete

    Etymology

    From Inter: etyl » enm Inter: term » magik|lang=enm, from Inter: etyl » fro Inter: term » magique|lang=fro, reborrowed from Inter: etyl » la Inter: term » magice|lang=la, borrowed from Inter: etyl » grc Inter: term » μαγική||magical|tr=magikē|sc=polytonic|lang=grc (Inter: term » τέχνη||art|tr=tekhnē|sc=polytonic|lang=grc), derived from Inter: term » μάγος|tr=magos|sc=polytonic|lang=grc, from Inter: term » magos magus, sorcerer, of Iranian origin; akin to Old Persian {{term|
  • Magic at English (WD) Of Explained:

    Inter: also » magic

    English

    Inter: wikipedia » Magic (cryptography)

    Proper noun

    Inter: en-proper nou » n
  • The decrypted Japanese messages produced by US cryptographers in and prior to World War II.

    Related terms

    * Ultra Inter: gloss » the UK effort to decrypt German messages in WW II

    Anagrams

    * gamic

  • Translation: id » Magic
    Translation: sr » Magic