Online Dictionary

stagger Explained

stagger at CMU American English spelling Of Explained:

['stægə]

stagger at English => English (English Etymology) Of Explained:

early 14c., stakeren, from O.N. stakra or O.Dan. stagra, both "to push, stagger." Sense of "bewilder, amaze" first recorded 1556; that of "arrange in a zig-zag pattern" is from 1856. ///

stagger at English => English (Longman) Of Explained:

v [Date: 1500-1600; Origin: stacker 'to stagger' (13-19 centuries), from Old Norse stakra, from staka 'to push']//
1 [I always + adverb/preposition] to walk or move unsteadily, almost falling over: stumble// --He managed to stagger home.// --She staggered back a step.// --The old man staggered drunkenly to his feet.//
2 [T] to make someone feel very surprised or shocked: amaze// --What staggered us was the sheer size of her salary.//
3 [I] also stagger on : to continue doing something when you seem to be going to fail and you do not know what will happen// --He staggered on for another two years.// stagger from sth to sth// --The company staggered from one crisis to the next.//
4 [T] to arrange people's working hours, holidays etc so that they do not all begin and end at the same time: --Jim and his wife stagger their work hours so one of them can be at home with the kids.//
5 [T] to start a race with each runner at a different place on a curved track:
stagger 2 n [C usually singular] an unsteady movement of someone who is having difficulty in walking//

stagger at English => English (Moby Thesaurus II) Of Explained:

290 Moby Thesaurus words for "stagger":
affright, agitate, alarm, alternate, amaze, amble, amplitude,
arrhythmia, astonish, astound, awe, awestrike, back and fill,
barge, be drunk, be incredible, be intoxicated, be unbelievable,
bedaze, bedazzle, bewilder, blunder, boggle, bowl along, bowl down,
bowl over, brokenness, bundle, burden, camber, capriciousness,
capsize, careen, career, choppiness, clump, come a cropper,
confound, crack, crankle, curdle the blood, daze, dazzle,
desultoriness, devastate, discombobulate, discompose, disconcert,
disconnectedness, discontinuity, disquiet, disturb, dither, do,
drag, droop, dumbfound, dumbfounder, ebb and flow, eccentricity,
electrify, erraticness, fall, fall down, fall flat, fall headlong,
fall over, fall prostrate, falter, fare, fibrillation,
fill with doubt, fitfulness, fits and starts, flabbergast,
flight path, floor, flounce, flounder, fluctuate, fluctuation,
flummox, flurry, fluster, flutter, foot, footslog, fright,
frighten, funk, fuss, gait, gallop, get, get a cropper, go,
go through phases, halt, have two minds, hippety-hop, hitch,
hobble, hop, horripilate, inconstancy, intermittence, irregularity,
jar, jerkiness, jog, jolt, jump, knock over, labor, limp, list,
lock step, lumber, lunge, lurch, make one tremble, mince,
mincing steps, muddle through, nonplus, nonuniformity, oscillate,
overcome, overpower, overwhelm, pace, paddle, paralyze,
pass belief, pass out, patchiness, peg, pendulate, perplex,
perturb, petrify, piaffe, piaffer, pitch, pitch and plunge, plod,
plunge, pop, prance, puzzle, rack, raise apprehensions, rattle,
rearrange, reel, ring the changes, rock, roll, roughness, ruffle,
sashay, saunter, scare, scuff, scuffle, scuttle, see double,
seesaw, seethe, shake, shake up, shamble, shatter, shift,
shilly-shally, shock, shot, shuffle, sidle, single-foot,
skin effect, skin friction, skip, slap, slink, slip, slither, slog,
slouch, slowness, space out, spasticity, spook, sporadicity,
sporadicness, spottiness, sprawl, spread-eagle, stab, stalk,
stammer, stamp, startle, step, stir, stiver, stomp, straddle,
straggle, stride, strike dead, strike dumb, strike with wonder,
stroll, strolling gait, struggle, strut, stumble, stump, stun,
stupefy, surprise, swagger, sway, swing, take a fall, take a flop,
take a header, take a pratfall, take a spill, take aback, tax,
teeter, teeter-totter, thrash about, tilt, tittup, toddle, topple,
topple down, topple over, toss, toss and tumble, toss and turn,
totter, traipse, tread, trip, trot, trouble, trudge, try, tumble,
turn, turn turtle, uncertainty, unevenness, unman,
unmethodicalness, unnerve, unpredictability, unsettle,
unsteadiness, unstring, unsystematicness, upset, vacillate,
variability, vary, velocity, volutation, waddle, walk, wallop,
wallow, wamble, waver, wax and wane, weave, welter, whack, wheel,
whiffle, whimsicality, whirl, wiggle, wobble, zag, zig, zigzag

stagger at English => English (English Thesaurus) Of Explained:

[V] (Agitation): be agitated, shake, tremble, quiver, quaver, quake, shiver, stagger, wriggle, wiggle, flounder, totter.

stagger at English => English (Oxford Advanced Learners) Of Explained:

verb
1 to walk with weak unsteady steps, as if you are about to fall: [V, usually +adv./prep.] The injured woman staggered to her feet. * He staggered home, drunk. * We seem to stagger from one crisis to the next. * (figurative) The company is staggering under the weight of a 」10m debt * [VN] I managed to stagger the last few steps.
2 to shock or surprise sb very much:
[VN] Her remarks staggered me. * [V that] It staggers me that the government is doing nothing about it.
3 [VN] to arrange for events that would normally happen at the same time to start or happen at different times:
There were so many runners, that they had to stagger the start.
stagger noun:
to walk with a stagger

Stagger at English => English (Websters 1913) Of Explained:

Stagger \Stag"ger\, v. t.
1. To cause to reel or totter.

That hand shall burn in never-quenching fire That
staggers thus my person. --Shak.

2. To cause to doubt and waver; to make to hesitate; to make
less steady or confident; to shock.

Whosoever will read the story of this war will find
himself much stagered. --Howell.

Grants to the house of Russell were so enormous, as
not only to outrage economy, but even to stagger
credibility. --Burke.

3. To arrange (a series of parts) on each side of a median
line alternately, as the spokes of a wheel or the rivets
of a boiler seam.

Stagger \Stag"ger\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Staggered}; p. pr. &
vb. n. {Staggering}.] [OE. stakeren, Icel. stakra to push, to
stagger, fr. staka to punt, push, stagger; cf. OD. staggeren
to stagger. Cf. {Stake}, n.]
1. To move to one side and the other, as if about to fall, in
standing or walking; not to stand or walk with steadiness;
to sway; to reel or totter.

Deep was the wound; he staggered with the blow.
--Dryden.

2. To cease to stand firm; to begin to give way; to fail.
``The enemy staggers.'' --Addison.

3. To begin to doubt and waver in purposes; to become less
confident or determined; to hesitate.

He [Abraham] staggered not at the promise of God
through unbelief. --Rom. iv. 20.

Stagger \Stag"ger\, n.
1. An unsteady movement of the body in walking or standing,
as if one were about to fall; a reeling motion; vertigo;
-- often in the plural; as, the stagger of a drunken man.

2. pl. (Far.) A disease of horses and other animals, attended
by reeling, unsteady gait or sudden falling; as, parasitic
staggers; appopletic or sleepy staggers.

3. pl. Bewilderment; perplexity. [R.] --Shak.

{Stomach staggers} (Far.), distention of the stomach with
food or gas, resulting in indigestion, frequently in
death.

stagger at English => English (WordNet) Of Explained:

stagger
n : an unsteady uneven gait [syn: {lurch}, {stumble}]

stagger
v 1: walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken
man staggered into the room" [syn: {reel}, {keel}, {lurch},
{swag}, {careen}]
2: walk with great difficulty; "He staggered along in the heavy
snow" [syn: {flounder}]
3: to arrange in a systematic order; "stagger the chairs in the
lecture hall" [syn: {distribute}]
4: astound or overwhelm, as with shock; "She was staggered with
bills after she tried to rebuild her house following the
earthquake"

stagger at English (WD) Of Explained:

==English==

Etymology

From Inter: etyl » non Inter: term » stakra (to push)Etymology in Translation: :w » Online Etymology Dictionary|Online Etymology Dictionary.

Pronunciation

* Inter: rhymes » æɡə(r)

Noun

Inter: en-nou » n
  • An unsteady movement of the body in walking or standing, as if one were about to fall; a reeling motion; vertigo; -- often in the plural; as, the stagger of a drunken man.
    1. A disease of horses and other animals, attended by reeling, unsteady gait or sudden falling; as, parasitic staggers; apoplectic or sleepy staggers.
    2. bewilderment; perplexity.

      Translations

      Inter: trans-top » an unsteady movement of the body in walking or standing

  • Arabic: Inter: t- » ar|ترنح|sc=Arab
  • Catalan: Inter: t+ » ca|titubar, Inter: t+ » ca|titubejar
  • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|wankel
  • Finnish: Inter: t- » fi|hoipertelu

  • Inter: trans-mi » d
    • German: Inter: t- » de|Schwanken|n, Inter: t- » de|Wanken|n
    • Greek: Inter: t+ » el|παραπατώ
    • Hungarian: Inter: t- » hu|botladozás
    • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|шатание|n|tr=šatánije|sc=Cyrl
    • Spanish: Inter: t » es|tambaleo


    Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » a disease of horses and other animals
    Inter: trans-mi » d
    Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » bewilderment; perplexity
    • Hungarian: Inter: t- » hu|döbbenet


    Inter: trans-mi » d
    Inter: trans-botto » m

    Verb

    Inter: en-ver » b
  • sway unsteadily, reel, or totter
    1. Inter: intransitiv » e In standing or walking, to sway from one side to the other as if about to fall; to stand or walk unsteadily; to reel or totter.
    2. : She began to stagger across the room.
    3. Inter: transitiv » e To cause to reel or totter.
    4. : The powerful blow of his opponents fist staggered the boxer.''
    5. Inter: intransitiv » e To cease to stand firm; to begin to give way; to fail.
    6. : After the second earthquake, the clock tower began to stagger.
    7. doubt, waver, be shocked
    8. Inter: intransitiv » e To begin to doubt and waver in purposes; to become less confident or determined; to hesitate.
    9. : Under severe criticism, the leader began to stagger.
    10. Inter: transitiv » e To cause to doubt and waver; to make to hesitate; to make less steady or confident; to shock.
    11. : He will stagger the committee when he presents his report.
    12. Inter: transitiv » e Multiple groups doing the same thing in a uniform fashion, but starting at different, evenly-spaced, times or places (attested from 1856Etymology in Translation: :w » Online Etymology Dictionary|Online Etymology Dictionary).
    13. To arrange (a series of parts) on each side of a median line alternately, as the spokes of a wheel or the rivets of a boiler seam (this involves only two groups).
    14. To arrange similar objects such that each is ahead or above and to one side of the next.
    15. : We will stagger the starting positions for the race on the oval track. (each runner is his own group)
    16. To schedule in intervals.
    17. : We will stagger the run so the faster runners can go first, then the joggers. (again, there are only two groups)

      Translations

      Inter: trans-top » to move to one side and the other, as if about to fall, in standing or walking

  • Chinese:
  • : Mandarin: Inter: t » cmn|踉蹌|sc=Hani, Inter: t » cmn|踉跄|tr=liàngqiàng|sc=Hani
  • Finnish: Inter: t- » fi|hoiperrella, Inter: t+ » fi|horjua, Inter: t+ » fi|toikkaroida
  • French: Inter: t+ » fr|tituber
  • German: Inter: t+ » de|wackeln, Inter: t+ » de|wanken, Inter: t+ » de|taumeln
  • Hungarian: Inter: t+ » hu|botladozik

  • Inter: trans-mi » d
    • Italian: Inter: t- » it|barcollare
    • Japanese: Inter: t- » ja|よろめく|tr=yoromeku|sc=Jpan
    • Portuguese: Inter: t+ » pt|cambalear
    • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|шататься|tr=šatát'sja|sc=Cyrl
    • Spanish: Inter: t- » es|tambalear


    Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » to walk in an awkward, drunken fashion
    • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|wankelen, Inter: t+ » nl|waggelen
    • French: Inter: t+ » fr|tituber
    • German: Inter: t+ » de|torkeln
    • Italian: Inter: t- » it|barcollare


    Inter: trans-mi » d
  • Portuguese: Inter: t+ » pt|cambalear
  • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|шататься|tr=šatát'sja|sc=Cyrl
  • Spanish: Inter: t- » es|tambalear
  • Swedish: Inter: t+ » sv|ragla

  • Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: trans-top » to begin to doubt and waver in purposes
    • Dutch: Inter: t+ » nl|twijfelen
    • Finnish: Inter: t- » fi|epäröidä, Inter: t+ » fi|horjua
    • French: Inter: t+ » fr|chanceler
    • German: Inter: t+ » de|zweifeln, Inter: t+ » de|wanken
    • Italian: Inter: t- » it|tentennare


    Inter: trans-mi » d
  • Polish: Inter: t+ » pl|wahać się
  • Portuguese: Inter: t+ » pt|hesitar
  • Russian: Inter: t+ » ru|колебаться|tr=kolebát'sja|sc=Cyrl
  • Spanish: Inter: t- » es|vacilar
  • Swedish: Inter: t+ » sv|vackla

  • Inter: trans-botto » m
    Inter: checktrans-to » p
    • Inter: ttbc » fr: quinconce, en (7)


    Inter: trans-botto » m

    See also

    * staggeringly
  • staggers

    References

    Anagrams

    * gagster, gargets, taggers

  • Category: Category:en:Gaits -
    Translation: bg » stagger
    Translation: et » stagger
    Translation: el » stagger
    Translation: fr » stagger
    Translation: ko » stagger
    Translation: io » stagger
    Translation: kn » stagger
    Translation: hu » stagger
    Translation: mg » stagger
    Translation: ml » stagger
    Translation: my » stagger
    Translation: pl » stagger
    Translation: tl » stagger
    Translation: ta » stagger
    Translation: te » stagger
    Translation: tr » stagger
    Translation: vi » stagger
    Translation: zh » stagger